Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Can Anyone Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

When To Get The Vaccine

Ways you can avoid pneumonia

Thereâs no such thing as pneumonia season, like flu season. If you and your doctor decide that you need to have a pneumonia vaccine, you can get it done at any time of the year. If itâs flu season, you can even get a pneumonia vaccine at the same time that you get a flu vaccine, as long as you receive each shot in a different arm.

So Who Needs The Pneumonia Vaccines

Great question! Pneumonia disproportionately affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised, so the CDC recommends these vulnerable patient populations to receive the pneumonia vaccines.3 The CDC created an immunization schedule that outlines when the two pneumonia vaccines should be received.

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for:2

  • All children younger than 2 years old
  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*

CDC recommends vaccination with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for:2

  • All adults 65 years or older
  • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions*
  • Adults 19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes

*Certain medical conditions such as: chronic heart disease, lung disease, liver disease, diabetes, HIV, or certain cancers warrant some adults to receive the pneumonia vaccines before the age of 65.4

The Different Types Of Pneumococcal Vaccine

The type of pneumococcal vaccine you’re given depends on your age and health. There are 2 types.

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is used to vaccinate children under 2 years old as part of the NHS vaccination schedule. It’s known by the brand name Prevenar 13.

Children at risk of pneumococcal infections can have the PPV vaccine from the age of 2 years onwards. The PPV vaccine is not very effective in children under the age of 2.

Don’t Miss: Do You Have A Dry Cough With Pneumonia

Pneumonia Treatments And Covid

According to the World Health Organization , bacterial pneumonia should be treated with antibiotics, which are usually prescribed at a health center.

If your symptoms are severe, it is important that you call your healthcare provideror seek immediate helpto get the proper treatment. Severe symptoms include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Bluish color in your lips or fingertips
  • A high fever
  • Cough with mucus that is severe or worsening

Although COVID-19 is caused by a virus, people with the illness can still develop a superinfection, which is a reinfection or secondary infection caused by bacteria. If this happens, antibiotics will be given to the patient. In order to prevent antibiotic resistance, when antibiotics become useless against bacteria, some researchers have suggested following antimicrobial stewardship principles .

Moreover, because severe cases of pneumonia may require treatment at a hospital, healthcare providers must consider the chance that a patient may acquire coinfections in hospitals. So, to be safe and not add to superinfection among hospitalized patients, antibiotics are warranted.

What Is Pneumococcal Disease

It

Pneumococcal disease is caused by Streptococcus pneumonia, bacteria that can attack different parts of the body. The bacteria can cause serious infections of the lungs , the bloodstream and the covering of the brain .

Pneumococcal pneumonia is a serious illness, accounting for 10 percent to 25 percent annually of all pneumonias. Nationally, about 40,000 persons die as a result of pneumococcal pneumonia each year, but the illness is particularly dangerous for the very young, the elderly and persons with certain high-risk conditions. For example, among people 65 years of age and older with pneumococcal pneumonia, about 20 percent to 30 percent develop bacteremia. At least 20 percent of those with bacteremia die from it, even though they receive antibiotics.

Read Also: How Much Time Between Flu Shot And Pneumonia Shot

Common And Local Adverse Events

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

Studies of Pneu-C-13 vaccine indicated that irritability decreased appetite increased or decreased sleep and pain, swelling and redness at the injection site after the toddler dose and in older children, are common side effects. Low grade fever occurred in 20% to 30% or more of vaccine recipients. In adults over 50 years of age, the most commonly reported side effects included pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache and new onset of myalgia, with fever above 38°C occurring in approximately 3% of vaccine recipients.

Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine

Reactions to Pneu-P-23 vaccine are usually mild. Soreness, redness and swelling at the injection site occur in 30% to 60% of vaccine recipients and more commonly follow SC administration than IM administration. Occasionally, low grade fever may occur. Re-immunization of healthy adults less than 2 years after the initial dose is associated with increased injection site and systemic reactions. Studies have suggested that re-vaccination after an interval of at least 4 years is not associated with an increased incidence of adverse side effects. However, severe injection site reactions, including reports of injection site cellulitis and peripheral edema in the injected extremity, have been documented rarely with Pneu-P-23 vaccine in post-marketing surveillance, even with the first dose. Multiple re-vaccinations are not recommended refer to Booster doses and re-immunization.

About Author: Ken Harris

Ken Harris is the proudest father and a writing coordinator for the Marketing & Communications division of OSF HealthCare.He has a bachelor’s in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked as a daily newspaper reporter for four years before leaving the field and eventually finding his way to OSF HealthCare.In his free time, Ken likes reading, fly fishing, hanging out with his dog and generally pestering his lovely, patient wife.

Also Check: Does It Hurt To Breathe With Pneumonia

What Are The Pneumonia Vaccines

There are two FDA-approved vaccines that protect against pneumonia:

  • 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, or PCV13

  • 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, or PPSV23

These immunizations are called pneumonia vaccines because they prevent pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. They are also known as pneumococcal vaccines because they protect against a bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus. Although there are many viruses, bacteria, and fungi that cause pneumonia, pneumococcus is the most common cause. Pneumococcus can also cause infections in other parts of the body.

Side Effects Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

Infectious disease doctor: Flu or pneumonia vaccine can help in fight against coronavirus

Like most vaccines, the childhood and adult versions of the pneumococcal vaccine can sometimes cause mild side effects.

These include:

  • redness where the injection was given
  • hardness or swelling where the injection was given

There are no serious side effects listed for either the childhood or adult versions of the vaccine, apart from an extremely rare risk of a severe allergic reaction .

Also Check: Name Of Pneumonia Vaccine For Adults

What If It Is Not Clear What A Person’s Vaccination History Is

When indicated, vaccines should be administered to patients with unknown vaccination status. All residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should have their vaccination status assessed and documented.

How long must a person wait to receive other vaccinations?

Inactivated influenza vaccine and tetanusvaccines may be given at the same time as or at any time before or after a dose of pneumococcus vaccine. There are no requirements to wait between the doses of these or any other inactivated vaccines.

Vaccination of children recommended

In July 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC jointly recommended childhood pneumococcal immunization, since pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States.

“The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV13 or Prevnar 13, is currently recommended for all children younger than 5 years of age, all adults 65 years or older, and persons 6 through 64 years of age with certain medical conditions,” according to the 2014 AAP/CDC guidelines. “Pneumovax is a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that is currently recommended for use in all adults 65 years of age or older and for persons who are 2 years and older and at high risk for pneumococcal disease . PPSV23 is also recommended for use in adults 19 through 64 years of age who smoke cigarettes or who have asthma.”

Who Should Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the pneumococcal vaccine for those who fall into the following groups:

  • All babies and children younger than 2 years old.
  • All adults 65 years or older.
  • Adults 19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes.
  • Children older than 2 and adults younger than 65 who have certain chronic diseases .
  • Those who are at increased risk for certain diseases and those who have impaired immune systems.

The recommendations are sometimes confusing, so its a good idea to talk to your doctor about your questions and concerns, Dr. Suri says.

And dont wait to have that conversation. This is an infection you see year-round, she adds.

You May Like: Is Pneumonia Viral Or Bacterial

Problems That Could Happen After Getting Any Injected Vaccine

  • People sometimes faint after a medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you or your child:
  • Feel dizzy
  • Have vision changes
  • Have ringing in the ears
  • Some people get severe pain in the shoulder and have difficulty moving the arm where the doctor gave the shot. This happens very rarely.
  • Any medicine can cause a severe allergic reaction. Such reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at about 1 in a million shots. These types of reactions would happen within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.
  • As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.
  • Allergic Reaction To The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Pneumonia Vaccination Service 2020

    In rare cases, people have an allergic reaction to the pneumonia vaccine shortly after receiving their jab. This is known as anaphylaxis, and it can be life-threatening.

    The good news is, all doctors, nurses and pharmacists who administer the jab are trained to deal with anaphylaxis. If you happen to have a severe reaction, the medical professional who gave you the jab will be able to carry out emergency treatment.

    You May Like: Pneumonia Vaccine Type 1 Diabetes

    Who Should Get Immunised Against Pneumococcal Disease

    Anyone who wants to protect themselves against pneumococcal disease can talk to their doctor about getting immunised.

    Pneumococcal immunisation is recommended for:

    • infants and children aged under 5 years
    • non-Indigenous adults aged 70 years and over without medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged under 5 years living in Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults aged 50 years and over without medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • infants under 12 months diagnosed with certain medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • people over 12 months with certain medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease

    There are two types of pneumococcal vaccine provided free under the National Immunisation Program for different age groups and circumstances:

    Refer to the NIP schedule for vaccine dosage information. Your doctor or vaccination provider will advise if you or your child have a specified medical risk condition.

    Refer to the pneumococcal recommendations in the Australian Immunisation Handbook for more information.

    How Does The Pneumonia Vaccine Work

    There are currently two vaccines administered in the United States:

  • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine . This vaccine joins a protein which helps build immunity. Infants and very young children do not respond to polysaccharide antigens, but linkage to this protein enables the developing immune system to recognize and process polysaccharide antigens, leading to production of antibody. It helps protect against disease from13 types of Streptococcal pneumoniae capsular serotypes that are the most common cause of serious infection. Typically, children receive three doses and adults at high risk of severe pneumococcal infection receive one dose.
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine . This vaccine looks like certain bacteria. This stimulates the body to build protection against the 23 serotypes of Streptococcal pneumonia contained in the vaccine. These 23 serotypes now represent at least 50% to 60% of pneumococcal disease isolates in adults. Most people receive a single dose, with one to two boosters recommended for some.
  • Also Check: What To Do To Help Get Rid Of Pneumonia

    How Do The Pneumonia Vaccines Work

    Like all vaccines, pneumococcal vaccines work by showing the immune system a version of the microbe, or a part of it, that is responsible for the infection. The pneumococcal vaccine contains part of the pneumococcus bacterias outer shell, made of molecules called polysaccharides. The immune system learns to recognize it, attack it, and defend the body against it, should it ever come into contact with the real bacteria.

    The body does this by making antibodies against the shell of the pneumococcus bacteria. These antibodies stay in your bloodstream as part of your immune system. If you are exposed to pneumococci in the future, the antibodies recognize the bacterias shell and launch a targeted defense.

    There are strains of pneumococcus, so the vaccines are made up of molecules from many of those strains.

    Patients In Health Care Institutions

    Concerns about lung infection from coronavirus raise questions about pneumonia vaccine

    Residents of long-term care facilities should receive Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Refer to Recommendations for Use for information about pneumococcal vaccination of individuals at increased risk of IPD. Refer to Immunization of Patients in Health Care Institutions in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of patients in health care institutions.

    Don’t Miss: How Long Is Pneumonia Shot Last

    Should You Get A Flu Shot

    In general, every person with diabetes needs a flu shot each year. Talk with your doctor about having a flu shot. Flu shots do not give 100% protection, but they do make it less likely for you to catch the flu for about six months.

    For extra safety, it’s a good idea for the people you live with or spend a lot of time with to get a flu shot, too. You are less likely to get the flu if the people around you don’t have it.

    The best time to get your flu shot is beginning in September. The shot takes about two weeks to take effect.

    If youre sick , ask if you should wait until you are healthy again before having your flu shot. And don’t get a flu shot if you are allergic to eggs.

    You are advised to continue to take the general precautions of preventing seasonal flu and other communicable illnesses and diseases:

    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash. If you dont have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hand.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread that way.
    • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
    • If you get sick, stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

    Whats In The Pneumonia Vaccine

    The first thing to know is that there are two types of pneumonia vaccine:

    • Prevenar 13 pneumococcal conjugate vaccine which is given to babies and young children as part of their routine NHS vaccinations. It can also be given to adults who arent in a high-risk group. This type prevents against 13 strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia.
    • Pneumovax 23 pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine which is given to people over 65 and anyone with a health condition that makes them high-risk for pneumonia and its complications. This type prevents against 23 strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia.

    Both of these vaccines work in the same way: by encouraging your body to produce antibodies which can fight off pneumococcal bacteria the bacteria that cause pneumonia. Once youve had the vaccine, your body will be better able to fight off infection.

    This year to help support the NHS we are just offering the Prevenar 13 vaccination in our stores. This is so the NHS has enough of the Pneumovax 23 to vaccinate those in our communities who are most at risk of catching pneumonia. If you fall into the NHS high-risk category, please contact your GP for advice and to have Pneumovax 23.

    You May Like: Signs Of Pneumonia After Surgery

    Get The Pneumonia Vaccine At Your Local Pharmacy

    We have a pneumonia vaccination service offering Prevenar 13 for anyone over 18, as long as its safe for you to have. You can book your vaccine online or come into store and speak to a pharmacist first to check its suitable for you. This is a great option for people who want to get vaccinated but who dont qualify for a free jab on the NHS.

    ihealth-non-contact-thermometer,paracetamol-500mg-effervescent-tablets,nutri-within-25ug-vitamin-d3-365-tablets,lloydspharmacy-no-contact-thermometer,high-strength-effervescent-vitamin-c-1000mg-20-effervescent-tablets,covonia-chesty-cough-mixture-mentholated-150ml,lemsip-cough-max-for-mucus-cough-and-cold-capsules-16-capsules,lloydspharmacy-dry-tickly-cough-oral-solution-300ml,ultra-chloraseptic-anaesthetic-throat-spray-cherry-flavour-15ml

    Should A Person Who Already Has Had Pneumonia Get The Vaccine

    Pneumococcal (Pneumonia)

    Experts agree that persons who already have had pneumonia can benefit from the vaccine. There are many kinds of pneumonia and having one kind does not ensure immunity against the others. The vaccine protects against 88 percent of the pneumococcal bacteria that cause pneumonia. However, it does not guarantee that you will never get pneumonia, and it does not protect against viral pneumonia.

    Don’t Miss: How To Clear Up Pneumonia

    Select Safety Information For Pneumovax 23

    Do not administer PNEUMOVAX®23 to individuals with a history of a hypersensitivity reaction to any component of the vaccine.

    Defer vaccination with PNEUMOVAX 23 in persons with moderate or severe acute illness.

    Use caution and appropriate care in administering PNEUMOVAX 23 to individuals with severely compromised cardiovascular and/or pulmonary function in whom a systemic reaction would pose a significant risk.

    Available human data from clinical trials of PNEUMOVAX 23 in pregnancy have not established the presence or absence of a vaccine-associated risk.

    Since elderly individuals may not tolerate medical interventions as well as younger individuals, a higher frequency and/or a greater severity of reactions in some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

    Persons who are immunocompromised, including persons receiving immunosuppressive therapy, may have a diminished immune response to PNEUMOVAX 23.

    PNEUMOVAX 23 may not be effective in preventing pneumococcal meningitis in patients who have chronic cerebrospinal fluid leakage resulting from congenital lesions, skull fractures, or neurosurgical procedures.

    For subjects aged 65 years or older in a clinical study, systemic adverse reactions which were determined by the investigator to be vaccine-related were higher following revaccination than following initial vaccination.

    Vaccination with PNEUMOVAX 23 may not offer 100% protection from pneumococcal infection.

    Popular Articles
    Related news