Thursday, September 29, 2022

How Long Does It Take To Fully Recover From Pneumonia

What Does Covid Do To Lungs

1 in 3 People Who Recover From COVID-19 May Develop Long-Term Symptoms | NBCLA

COVID-19 can cause lung complications such as pneumonia and, in the most severe cases, acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS. , another possible complication of COVID-19, can also cause lasting harm to the lungs and other organs.

As we have learned more about SARS-CoV-2 and resulting COVID-19, we have discovered that in severe COVID-19, a significant pro-inflammatory condition can result in several critical diseases, complications and syndromes, Galiatsatos says.

Who Is Most Likely To Get Aspiration Pneumonia

Aspiration pneumonia is more common among people who:

  • Have had general anesthesia or dental procedures.
  • Have trouble coughing or trouble swallowing. Trouble swallowing is known as dysphagia. These issues are more common among people with brain injury or nervous system disorders like Parkinsons disease or multiple sclerosis.
  • Have been drinking or taking drugs to excess.
  • Are older . Aspiration pneumonia is more common among people who live in nursing homes.
  • Have weak immune systems due to some illness, or underdeveloped immune systems due to being very young .

Can I Prevent Pneumonia

The routine vaccinations that most people receive as kids help prevent certain types of pneumonia and other infections. If you have a chronic illness, such as sickle cell disease, you may have received extra vaccinations and disease-preventing antibiotics to help prevent pneumonia and other infections caused by bacteria.

People should get a pneumococcal vaccination if they have diseases that affect their immune system , are 65 years or older, or are in other high-risk groups. Depending on the bugs that are likely to affect them, these people also may get antibiotics to prevent pneumonia, as well as antiviral medicine to prevent or lessen the effects of viral pneumonia.

Doctors recommend that everyone 6 months and older get an annual flu shot. That’s because someone with the flu could then come down with pneumonia. Call your doctor’s office or check your local health department to see when these vaccines are available.

Because pneumonia is often caused by germs, a good way to prevent it is to keep your distance from anyone you know who has pneumonia or other respiratory infections. Use separate drinking glasses and eating utensils wash your hands often with warm, soapy water and avoid touching used tissues and paper towels.

You also can stay strong and help avoid some of the illnesses that might lead to pneumonia by eating as healthily as possible, getting a minimum of 8 to 10 hours of sleep a night, and not smoking.

Also Check: How Do You Check For Pneumonia

How Common Is Aspiration Pneumonia

Aspiration of food or drink is a relatively common thing. Youve probably heard someone say that food “went down the wrong pipe, meaning that food or drink went toward your lungs instead of your stomach. When this happens, you probably coughed until you felt better.

When the same sort of thing happens to someone who isnt able to cough the food or drink out of their lungs, aspiration pneumonia may result.

What Is The Recovery Time For Covid Pneumonia

COVID Pneumonia: How Long Does Recovery Take?

Dr. Lee: Regardless of what causes it, regaining strength after pneumonia can take quite a long time from several weeks to many months.

During COVID pneumonia recovery, your body first has to repair the damage caused to the lungs then it has to deal with clearing leftover fluid and debris and, finally, scarring until the tissue is fully healed over all of which come with unpleasant symptoms.

For the 15% of infected individuals who develop moderate to severe COVID-19 and are admitted to the hospital for a few days and require oxygen, the average recovery time ranges between three to six weeks.

For the 5% who develop severe or critical illness, recovery can take much longer.

Everyone’s recovery is unique and depends on:

  • Your overall health
  • Whether you have preexisting conditions
  • The severity of your infection

If you are recovering from COVID pneumonia and experiencing persistent problems, I recommend seeing your doctor for a follow-up evaluation. If your recovery is prolonged, he or she may recommend a specialized program, such as pulmonary rehabilitation, to help get you back on track.

In some cases, patients will have lingering symptoms after the initial COVID-19 infection, often called post-COVID syndrome. These “long haulers” can have variety of problems, since the virus can attack not only the lungs, but also the heart, kidneys and brain. Your doctor can also help you manage these lingering symptoms.

Next Steps:

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Preventing Pneumonia In The Elderly

  • Wash their hands frequently: Everyone knows this piece of advice, but not everyone follows it. They should though, because frequent handwashing can greatly lower the risk of infections, including pneumonia.
  • Get vaccinated: Getting the pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine lowers seniors risk of getting bacterial pneumonia. Doctors recommend people get a first dose in their 50s, a second dose at age 65 and an additional dose every five years. An annual flu vaccine can also lower risk of pneumonia, because pneumonia sometimes develops as a complication of the flu.
  • Avoid people who have a cold or the flu: It may feel rude, but safety comes first. Make plans to see them when theyre feeling better. If you must be around people who are sick, wear a medical face mask to protect yourself.
  • Keep their teeth clean: Infected teeth are a prime place for a pneumonia infection to strike. Practice good oral hygiene and visit the dentist regularly to prevent that from happening.
  • Keep their homes clean: Dust, mold and mildew can hurt the lungs and increase risk of pneumonia. Seniors may need help from a loved one or a professional cleaning service to keep their homes free from these irritants.
  • Live a healthy life: Some of the practices used to treat pneumonia, like getting lots of rest, eating healthy and staying hydrated, can also help fend off illness in the first place. Getting regular exercise and choosing not to smoke cigarettes is also important.

When To See A Doctor

Chronic bronchitis can get worse over time, and so it needs to be treated. You should see a doctor as soon as possible if you suspect you may have chronic bronchitis.

Most of the time, acute bronchitis should resolve on its own. But contact a medical professional if you have:

  • A temperature above 100.4 degrees Farenheit
  • Bloody mucus from too much coughing
  • Wheezing and trouble breathing
  • Symptoms that persist for longer than three weeks
  • Bronchitis that goes away and comes back

If you think your bronchitis has developed into a secondary infection or moved into your lungs and caused pneumonia, contact a doctor.

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Who Is At Risk Of Pneumonia

Some groups of individuals are much more susceptible to pneumonia than others. These groups include:

  • Infants to 2 year olds
  • People 65 and older
  • Stroke survivors who have swallowing problems or are bedridden.
  • Those with weakened immune systems due to disease or medications
  • People who smoke, abuse drugs and alcohol
  • People with asthma, cystic fibrosis, diabetes or heart failure

For individuals who fall into any of these categories pneumonia can be seriously debilitating and recovery can take months. Early diagnosis combined with proper treatment is crucial to prevent pneumonia from worsening. In some cases patients may be hospitalized to receive intensive treatment and have their progress monitored.

Regardless of your general health and age, if you believe you are suffering from pneumonia it is crucial you get an official diagnosis and treatment plan from your doctor as soon as possible so you can start feeling healthy again.

Causes Of Walking Pneumonia

What is COVID pneumonia and can young people get it?

The most common cause of walking pneumonia is Mycoplasma pneumoniae, which can grow and live in the throat, nose, windpipe, and lungs. The bacteria do not have rigid cell walls, and the organisms can change their size and shape depending on their environment. The term atypical is derived from a mycoplasma pneumonia because the bacteria are resistant to penicillin and other antimicrobial agents.

Another microorganism that causes walking pneumonia is Chlamydia pneumoniae. This type of illness is spread through person-to-person contact when someone sneezes or coughs. School-age children are at the highest risk for this infection. Legionella pneumonia live in the environment and often grow in water. People with this disease acquire the illness when they inhale water mist or vapor containing the bacteria.

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The Difference Between Viral Pneumonia And Bacterial Pneumonia

Treatment is the biggest difference between bacterial and viral pneumonia. Bacterial pneumonia is treated with antibiotic therapy, while viral pneumonia will usually get better on its own. In some cases, viral pneumonia can lead to a secondary bacterial pneumonia. At that point, your doctor may prescribe antibiotic therapy. Your doctor will be able to tell if it has become bacterial pneumonia by a change in your symptoms or signs.

How Long Does It Take To Recover From Coronavirus

Senior Wellness & Travel Editor, HuffPost

News about the novel coronavirus, which causes the disease COVID-19, is more scary than reassuring. We hear a lot about death counts, terrifying symptoms and new infections, and less about recovery.

But people do get better in fact, more than 1 million people around the globe are considered recovered from COVID-19, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

But how long does it take to reach that point? And what are some signs that youre healthy again? Heres what we know:

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What If I Have Only Mild Symptoms

Most people who get Covid-19 will develop only the main symptoms – a cough or fever. But they could experience body aches, fatigue, sore throat and headache.

The cough is initially dry, but some people will eventually start coughing up mucus containing dead lung cells killed by the virus.

These symptoms are treated with bed rest, plenty of fluids and pain relief such as paracetamol.

People with mild symptoms should make a good and speedy recovery.

The fever should settle in less than a week, although the cough may linger. A World Health Organization analysis of Chinese data says it takes two weeks on average to recover.

No Lasting Lung Damage After Full Recovery From Covid

Double pneumonia: Causes, treatments, and symptoms

HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Aug. 20, 2021 — If you suffered a bout of COVID-19 and your lungs took a beating, new research has reassuring news: You will likely be spared long-term respiratory damage.

Scientists looked at COVID-19 survivors who had asymptomatic, moderate or severe COVID-19 infections and also underwent unrelated elective lung operations at some point after they recovered from COVID-19.

In all of the patients, benign lung tissue from around the nodules or tumors showed no detectable lasting lung damage that was directly linked to COVID-19.

“Since the start of the pandemic, a big question has been whether COVID-19 will have long-term or permanent damage on our lungs,” said senior study author Dr. Zaid Abdelsattar, a thoracic and cardiovascular surgeon at Loyola Medicine, in Maywood, Ill.

“This research provided us with the rare opportunity to study the asymptomatic survivors of COVID-19 and make observations to help us answer this question,” he said in a Loyola news release.

Autopsies of deceased COVID-19 patients and studies of patients with end-stage lung disease from COVID-19 have found a range of serious lung problems, the researchers noted.

“Further research is still needed on why some patients recover completely, and others don’t. Our study shows that if you contract COVID-19 and then completely recover clinically and on imaging, your lung tissues are also likely to have completely healed as well, without permanent damage,” Abdelsattar said.

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How Is Aspiration Pneumonia Diagnosed

Generally, the first thing your provider will do in any situation is take a complete medical history and perform a physical examination. Theyll ask you about your current signs and symptoms. One thing that is a little tricky about aspiration pneumonia is that often no one actually sees you breathe in an object or food or saliva.

In addition to taking note of your symptoms, your provider will order tests such as:

How Long Does It Take To Recover From Pneumonia

“Pneumonia is a serious illness that can take quite a toll on a person’s lungs and body. It can take anywhere from a week to several months to fully recover from it,” says Dr. Rayman Lee, pulmonologist at Houston Methodist.

The length of time it takes for you to recover from pneumonia is influenced by:

  • Your age
  • The severity of your illness
  • Whether you have other health conditions
  • The type of pneumonia

If you’re generally healthy and have only a mild case of pneumonia, your symptoms should begin to improve one to two days after starting treatment.

“Most people with mild pneumonia are able to return to their everyday activities in a week, although fatigue and cough can linger for an entire month,” says Dr. Lee.

Recovery timelines become more murky for people who have severe pneumonia.

“For more serious cases that require hospitalization, we’re not only focused on clearing the infection, we’re also focused on preventing or treating complications that can develop including difficulty breathing, fluid buildup in the lungs, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome and lung abscesses,” warns Dr. Lee.

Pneumonia and its complications can wreak havoc on a person’s lungs and body. And, it can take anywhere from one to six months for a person to recover and regain strength after being hospitalized for pneumonia.

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How Many Pneumonia Vaccines Do You Need

PCV13 or Prevnar 13, is currently recommended for all children younger than 2 years of age, all adults 65 years of age or older, and people 2-64 years of age with certain medical conditions.

PPSV23 is currently recommended for all adults 65 years of age or older and for people who are 2 years of age or older and at high risk for pneumococcal disease . PPSV23 is also recommended for use in adults 19-64 years of age who smoke cigarettes.

There is no evidence about the safety of PCV13 or PPSV23 vaccine use in pregnancy. Women who need the vaccine should be vaccinated before a pregnancy, if possible.

Some people may be recommended to receive both the PCV13 and PPSV23 vaccines. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two pneumococcal vaccines for all adults 65 years or older. The PCV13 and PPSV23 should not be given at the same time. When both vaccines are recommended, a dose of the PCV13 should be given first, followed by a dose of PPSV23 at another visit to a health care provider.

Seasonal influenza vaccines are available yearly and are recommended to decrease the chance of contracting influenza. Vaccines against the measles virus and varicella virus, two viruses that can also cause pneumonia, are also available. The common side effects of these vaccines are similar to those listed below for the pneumonia vaccine.

How Long Will It Take Me To Recover From Aspiration Pneumonia

Warner Robins woman recovering from COVID after plasma infusion

Most people recover from aspiration pneumonia in a week or so with treatment. Although you might be ready to return to work or school, you might still be tired for some time after a week. Many people are still tired up to a month into recovery.

Recurrent aspiration due to underlying medical or neurological conditions can be difficult to treat and needs expert care from a multidisciplinary team.

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Aspiration Pneumonia In Dogs

  • OTHER FAQ
  • Aspiration pneumonia in dogs is a condition in which a dogs lungs become inflamed as a result of foreign matter, from the regurgitation of gastric acid contents or vomiting.

    Dog pneumonia can also result from a neuromuscular disorder, which would cause difficulty with swallowing and issues related to the oesophagus, with possible paralysis of the oesophagus.

    READ MORE:

    Other causes for a dysfunction of the lungs may be inhalation of gastric acids or obstructed airway, which can cause extensive damage to the internal tissues of the lungs.

    Bacteria present in the inhaled foreign matter may also bring about infection.

    Aspiration pneumonia in dogs is more prevalent than in cats.

    What Is The Prognosis And Recovery Time Of Pneumonia Can You Die

    Most people with pneumonia improve after three to five days of antibiotic treatment, but a mild cough and fatigue can last longer, up to a month. Patients who required treatment in a hospital may take longer to see improvement.

    Pneumonia can also be fatal. The mortality rate is up to 30% for patients with severe pneumonia who require treatment in an intensive care unit. Overall, around 5%-10% of patients who are treated in a hospital setting die from the disease. Pneumonia is more likely to be fatal in the elderly or those with chronic medical conditions or a weakened immune system.

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    Can The Pneumonia Vaccine Prevent Pneumonia

      It is not possible to prevent all types of pneumonia, but one can take steps to reduce the chance of contracting the condition by quitting smoking, practicing good hand-washing, and avoiding contact with people who have colds, the flu, or other infections.

      A vaccine is available against the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia, Streptococcus pneumoniae . There are two types of vaccine: PPSV23 , a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine against 23 types of the bacteria, and PCV13 , a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine that protects against 13 types of the bacteria. These vaccines may not always prevent pneumococcal pneumonia, but they may prevent serious complications of pneumonia if it does occur.

      Avoidance of areas where fungal pathogens are endemic is recommended to prevent fungal pneumonias. There is no antifungal vaccine available however, for some high-risk patients, some doctors have recommended prophylactic antifungal drugs.

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