Monday, October 3, 2022

How Often Do You Have To Take The Pneumonia Shot

Immunization : Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

Ask the Expert: Who should get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

Vaccines or needles are the best way to protect against some very serious infections. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization strongly recommends routine immunization.

This vaccine protects adults and children two years of age and older against pneumococcal infections like pneumonia. This type of vaccine is only effective in people two years of age and older, and should not be given to children under two years of age. A different type of pneumococcal vaccine is effective in children under two years of age. This fact sheet refers to the “polysaccharide” vaccine only.

What Is The Pneumonia Vaccine

The pneumonia vaccine is an injection that prevents you from contracting pneumococcal disease. There are two pneumococcal vaccines licensed by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States:

  • PCV13 Prevnar 13®: This vaccine helps protect against the 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly cause serious infections in children and adults. Doctors give this vaccine to children at 12 through 15 months, 2, 4, and 6 years old. Adults who need this vaccine get just one shot.
  • PPSV23 Pneumovax23®: This vaccine helps protect against serious infections caused by 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria. Doctors give a single shot of this vaccine to people who need it, but the CDC recommends one or two additional shots for people with certain chronic medical conditions.
  • The Center for Disease Control recommends the PCV13 vaccine for:

    • All children younger than 2 years old
    • People 2 years or older with certain medical conditions

    The CDC recommends PPSV23 for:

    • All adults 65 years or older
    • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions
    • Smokers 19 through 64 years old

    What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Pneumococcal Immunisation

    All medicines and vaccines can have side effects. Sometimes they are serious, most of the time theyre not.

    For most people, the chance of having a serious side effect from a vaccine is much lower than the chance of serious harm if you caught the disease.

    Talk to your doctor about possible side effects of pneumococcal vaccines, or if you or your child have symptoms after having a pneumococcal vaccine that worry you.

    Common side effects of pneumococcal vaccines include:

    • pain, redness and swelling where the needle went in
    • fever
    • reduced appetite
    • body aches.

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    People Who Should Receive The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    A number of medical conditions put people at higher risk of pneumococcal disease and people with these conditions require immunisation.

    You should speak with your doctor about whether you are at risk.

    Pneumococcal immunisation is required for people who have:

    • no spleen or have a spleen with poor function
    • a weakened immune system includes people with immune deficiency, HIV infection, people receiving chemotherapy or radiotherapy, people who have received a transplant or people with a genetic immune deficiency
    • leakage of fluid from around the spine and brain
    • cochlear implants

    It is also required for people who:

    • smoke
    • use alcohol to a harmful degree
    • were born prematurely .

    Side Effects Of Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Your Child

    Like other vaccines, there are certain side effects associated with PCV13 and PPSV23 vaccines. You do not usually experience life-threatening complications though. Some people may have problems such as redness, swelling, and soreness at the site of the shot. This should resolve in a few days.

    About 1% of people experience other side effects after getting the shot, and the list includes muscle aches, fever, and severe swelling. A severe allergic reaction may occur if you are allergic to anything in the vaccines. The most common signs of a severe allergic reaction are dizziness, breathing difficulty, behavior changes, hives, high fever, hoarse voice, rapid heartbeat, pale skin, and weakness. Seek immediate medical assistance if you experience these symptoms.

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    Pneumonia Vaccine: How Often Should You Get It

    In the U.S., pneumococcal disease is responsible for killing thousands of people each year and about 18,000 of these are people older than 65. Thousands of adults have to stay in the hospital for proper treatment because the disease can cause several complications, including infections of the lining of the spinal cord and brain, bloodstream, and lungs. To ensure you do not have to deal with these complications, it is important to receive vaccinations for pneumococcal disease. The vaccine you receive contains the bacterium called Streptococcus pneumoniae that helps build immunity against bacterial pneumonia. While the vaccine definitely helps, you need to know when to get pneumonia vaccine. How often should you get the vaccine is anther question people ask. Here is the answer.

    Pneumococcal Diseases & Pneumonia Shots

    There is a category of diseases called pneumococcal disease, of which pneumonia is one of the most dangerousthe other most dangerous being meningitis. People with diabetes are about three times more likely to die with flu and pneumococcal diseases, yet most dont get a simple, safe pneumonia shot.

    Symptoms of pneumonia include:

    Cough that can produce mucus that is gray, yellow, or streaked with blood Chest pain

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    The Different Types Of Pneumococcal Vaccine

    The type of pneumococcal vaccine you’re given depends on your age and health. There are 2 types.

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is used to vaccinate children under 2 years old as part of the NHS vaccination schedule. It’s known by the brand name Prevenar 13.

    Children at risk of pneumococcal infections can have the PPV vaccine from the age of 2 years onwards. The PPV vaccine is not very effective in children under the age of 2.

    Who Should Get Immunised Against Pneumococcal Disease

    Do I need a pneumonia vaccine?

    Anyone who wants to protect themselves against pneumococcal disease can talk to their doctor about getting immunised.

    Pneumococcal immunisation is recommended for:

    • infants and children aged under 5 years
    • non-Indigenous adults aged 70 years and over without medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged under 5 years living in Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults aged 50 years and over without medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • infants under 12 months diagnosed with certain medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • people over 12 months with certain medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease

    There are two types of pneumococcal vaccine provided free under the National Immunisation Program for different age groups and circumstances:

    Refer to the NIP schedule for vaccine dosage information. Your doctor or vaccination provider will advise if you or your child have a specified medical risk condition.

    Refer to the pneumococcal recommendations in the Australian Immunisation Handbook for more information.

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    Are You 65 Or Older Get Two Vaccinations Against Pneumonia

    • By Gregory Curfman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Former Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Health Publishing

    ARCHIVED CONTENT: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date each article was posted or last reviewed. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

    If you or a loved one is age 65 or older, getting vaccinated against pneumonia is a good idea so good that the Centers for Disease Control now recommends that everyone in this age group get vaccinated against pneumonia twice.

    This new recommendation is based on findings from a large clinical trial called CAPiTA, which were published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, sometimes just called pneumococcus, is a common bacterium that can cause serious lung infections like pneumonia. It can also cause invasive infections of the bloodstream, the tissues covering the brain and spinal cord , and other organs and tissues. Older individuals are especially prone to being infected by Pneumococcus, and these infections are often deadly.

    The dark spots are pneumonia-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria isolated from the blood of an infected person.

    One caveat is that while PCV13 is effective in preventing pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae, it does not prevent pneumonia caused by viruses or other bacteria.

    When To See A Doctor

    A person who is over 65 years of age should talk to their doctor about which pneumonia vaccine may be best for them. The doctor can help determine whether they should get the vaccination, which vaccination to get, and when to get it.

    Parents and caregivers of young children should talk to a pediatrician about the schedule for the pneumonia vaccination. The pediatrician can also address any questions or concerns about the safety and effectiveness of the vaccination.

    A person does not need to see a doctor for mild reactions to the vaccine, such as tenderness at the injection site, fever, or fatigue.

    However, if a person experiences any life threatening side effects, they should seek emergency help immediately.

    Signs and symptoms of allergic reactions in children may include:

    • respiratory distress, such as wheezing

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    Summary Of Information Contained In This Naci Statement

    The following highlights key information for immunization providers. Please refer to the remainder of the Statement for details.

    1. What

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a bacterium that can cause many types of diseases including invasive pneumococcal disease , and community-acquired pneumonia .

    For the prevention of diseases caused by S. pneumoniae in adults, two types of vaccines are available in Canada: pneumococcal 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine containing 23 pneumococcal serotypes and pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine containing 13 pneumococcal serotypes.

    NACI has been tasked with providing a recommendation from a public health perspective on the use of pneumococcal vaccines in adults who are 65 years of age and older, following the implementation of routine childhood pneumococcal vaccine programs in Canada.

    2. Who

    Information in this statement is intended for provinces and territories making decisions for publicly funded, routine, immunization programs for adults who are 65 years of age and older without risk factors increasing their risk of IPD. These recommendations supplement the recent NACI recommendations on this topic that were issued for individual-level decision making in 2016.

    3. How

    4. Why

    Is Prevnar 23 The Same As Pneumovax 23

    What Is Pneumonia? Types, Causes, Diagnosis And Treatment

    The main difference between Pneumovax 23 and Prevnar 13 is how many different types of bacteria they target. Pneumovax 23 protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria and is used in adults, while Prevnar 13 protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria, and was designed primarily for children.

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    How Often Do I Need To Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

    The pneumonia vaccine also known as the pneumococcal vaccine offers protection against several strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia. There are two types of the vaccine, one of which is specifically designed for adults over the age of 65 and anyone particularly high-risk because of a long-term health condition. The other vaccine Prevnar 13 is available in our stores for adults aged 18 and over.*

    Most adults getting the pneumonia vaccine will only need to get it once. Others who are high risk may need to get booster jabs every few years.

    If youve never had the pneumonia vaccine, and you think you could benefit, you should check to see if youre eligible for it on the NHS. If not, you can book yours with us and have it in your local LloydsPharmacy.

    How Often Should My Children Get Pneumonia Vaccine

    The age of your child plays a big role in determining the frequency of getting pneumonia vaccine. How often should your child have the vaccine at different ages?

    Children Younger than 2 Years Old

    Your infants will get PCV13 vaccine as a series of four doses. The first dose will be given at 2 months, second at 4 months, third at 6 months, and the last one between 12 months and 15 months. Your children should get the vaccine even if they miss their shots in the beginning.

    Children from 2 to 5 Years Old

    Children between 24 months and 4 years old with incomplete PCV13 series should get one dose of it. Those who are in the same age group but has some medical conditions should get a couple of doses of PCV13 in case they have not completed the full course of vaccine. This is usually the case for children with medical conditions, such as cerebrospinal fluid leaks, cochlear implants, sickle cell disease, chronic heart or lung disease, and HIV/AIDS. Children who are on medications that weaken the immune system should get a dose under a physician’s supervision.

    Children from 6 to 8 Years Old

    Children between 6 and 8 years old should get a single dose of PCV13, especially if they have certain medical conditions, such as HIV-infection, sickle cell disease, and other conditions leading to compromised immunity. These children should receive PCV13 even if they have received doses of PCV7 or PPSV23 in the past. Talk to your healthcare provider for more details.

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    Pregnancy And Pneumococcal Immunisation

    Immunisation against pneumococcal disease is not usually recommended for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Women who are at increased risk of pneumococcal infection should be vaccinated before pregnancy or as soon as possible after giving birth. Speak with your doctor about whether you are at risk of infection and should be immunised.

    Who Should Not Get The Vaccine

    Pneumonia Vaccine: Clearing Up the Confusion – Gerald Brown, PA

    People should not get the vaccine if they have had a life threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose.

    Additionally, a person should not undergo vaccination if they have had an allergic reaction to medication containing diphtheria toxoid or an earlier form of the pneumonia vaccination .

    Lastly, people who are sick or have allergic reactions to any of the ingredients of the vaccine should talk to a doctor before getting the shot.

    A pneumonia shot will not reduce pneumonia. However, it helps prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases, such as meningitis, endocarditis, empyema, and bacteremia, which is when bacteria enter the bloodstream.

    Noninvasive pneumococcal disease includes sinusitis.

    There are two types of pneumonia shots available. Which type a person gets depends on their age, whether or not they smoke, and the presence of any underlying medical conditions.

    The two types are:

    • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : Healthcare providers recommend this vaccine for young children, people with certain underlying conditions, and some people over the age of 65 years.
    • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine : Healthcare providers recommend this vaccine for anyone over 65 years of age, people with certain underlying conditions, and people who smoke.

    According to the

    • roughly 8 in 10 babies from invasive pneumococcal disease
    • 45 in 100 adults 65 years or older against pneumococcal pneumonia
    • 75 in 100 adults 65 years or older against invasive pneumococcal disease

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    About Author: Ken Harris

    Ken Harris is the proudest father and a writing coordinator for the Marketing & Communications division of OSF HealthCare.He has a bachelor’s in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and worked as a daily newspaper reporter for four years before leaving the field and eventually finding his way to OSF HealthCare.In his free time, Ken likes reading, fly fishing, hanging out with his dog and generally pestering his lovely, patient wife.

    Types Of Pneumonia Vaccine

    The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine also known as Prevenar 13 offers protection against 13 strains of pneumococcal bacteria. This type is given to young children as part of their routine NHS vaccinations. Its also available for adults under 65 through our vaccination service.

    The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine also known as Pneumovax 23 offers protection against 23 strains of pneumococcal bacteria. This type is given to adults over 65 and anyone with a very high risk of pneumonia.

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    Side Effects Of Pneumonia Vaccine

    As with any medication, there is a risk of side effects from the pneumonia vaccine. However, they are usually harmless. The most common ones include:

    • Low-grade fever
    • Irritation at the site of injection
    • Drowsiness

    In babies, its possible to experience additional side effects. These include:

    • Irritability
    • Lack of appetite
    • An inability to fall asleep

    Seek medical attention immediately if you or your loved one experience signs of an allergic reaction. These include some or all of the following:

    • Breathing difficulties
    • Swelling of the mouth, lips, and/or tongue
    • Skin rash

    Flu And Pneumonia Shots

    Poor Denture / Dental Hygiene Has Been Linked To Pneumonia

    Having the flu can be dangerous for anyone. But it is extra risky for people with diabetes or other chronic health problems. Having diabetes means having more instances of high blood sugar than a person without diabetes. High blood sugar hinders your white blood cells ability to fight infections.

    Beyond people living with diabetes, flu is also extra risky for people with heart disease, smokers and those with chronic lung disease, people who have an impaired immune system , very young children, and people living in very close quarters, such as college dorms, military barracks, or nursing homes.

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    What To Know About The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Who needs it: The CDC recommends one pneumococcal vaccine for adults 19 to 64 with certain risk factors . If you work around chronically ill people say, in a hospital or nursing home you should get the vaccine, even if you’re healthy. People 65 and older can discuss with their health care provider whether they should get PCV13 if they haven’t previously received a dose. A dose of PPSV23 is recommended for those 65 and older, regardless of previous inoculations with pneumococcal vaccines.

    How often: Space immunizations out. You should receive a dose of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine , then, a year later, a dose of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine . People with any of the risk factors should get one dose of PCV13 and PPSV23 before age 65, separated by eight weeks.

    Why you need it: Pneumococcal disease, which can cause pneumonia, kills around 3,000 people a year. Young children and those over 65 have the highest incidence of serious illness, and older adults are more likely to die from it.

    Editors note: This article was published on Oct. 26, 2020. It was updated in September 2021 with new information.

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