Monday, September 26, 2022

How Often Should We Get A Pneumonia Shot

Should You Get A Flu Shot

Ask the Expert: Who should get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

In general, every person with diabetes needs a flu shot each year. Talk with your doctor about having a flu shot. Flu shots do not give 100% protection, but they do make it less likely for you to catch the flu for about six months.

For extra safety, it’s a good idea for the people you live with or spend a lot of time with to get a flu shot, too. You are less likely to get the flu if the people around you don’t have it.

The best time to get your flu shot is beginning in September. The shot takes about two weeks to take effect.

If youre sick , ask if you should wait until you are healthy again before having your flu shot. And don’t get a flu shot if you are allergic to eggs.

You are advised to continue to take the general precautions of preventing seasonal flu and other communicable illnesses and diseases:

  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash. If you dont have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hand.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread that way.
  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  • If you get sick, stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.

How Often Do I Need To Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

The pneumonia vaccine also known as the pneumococcal vaccine offers protection against several strains of bacteria that can cause pneumonia. There are two types of the vaccine, one of which is specifically designed for adults over the age of 65 and anyone particularly high-risk because of a long-term health condition. The other vaccine Prevnar 13 is available in our stores for adults aged 18 and over.*

Most adults getting the pneumonia vaccine will only need to get it once. Others who are high risk may need to get booster jabs every few years.

If youve never had the pneumonia vaccine, and you think you could benefit, you should check to see if youre eligible for it on the NHS. If not, you can book yours with us and have it in your local LloydsPharmacy.

Pneumonia Vaccine: How Often Should You Get It

In the U.S., pneumococcal disease is responsible for killing thousands of people each year and about 18,000 of these are people older than 65. Thousands of adults have to stay in the hospital for proper treatment because the disease can cause several complications, including infections of the lining of the spinal cord and brain, bloodstream, and lungs. To ensure you do not have to deal with these complications, it is important to receive vaccinations for pneumococcal disease. The vaccine you receive contains the bacterium called Streptococcus pneumoniae that helps build immunity against bacterial pneumonia. While the vaccine definitely helps, you need to know when to get pneumonia vaccine. How often should you get the vaccine is anther question people ask. Here is the answer.

You May Like: Is Pneumonia Contagious In Humans

Pneumococcal Diseases & Pneumonia Shots

There is a category of diseases called pneumococcal disease, of which pneumonia is one of the most dangerousthe other most dangerous being meningitis. People with diabetes are about three times more likely to die with flu and pneumococcal diseases, yet most dont get a simple, safe pneumonia shot.

Symptoms of pneumonia include:

Cough that can produce mucus that is gray, yellow, or streaked with blood Chest pain

The Different Types Of Pneumococcal Vaccine

Pneumonia shots: Coverage, costs, and eligibility

The type of pneumococcal vaccine you’re given depends on your age and health. There are 2 types.

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is used to vaccinate children under 2 years old as part of the NHS vaccination schedule. It’s known by the brand name Prevenar 13.

Children at risk of pneumococcal infections can have the PPV vaccine from the age of 2 years onwards. The PPV vaccine is not very effective in children under the age of 2.

You May Like: Can Pneumonia Cause High Heart Rate

Who Should Get The Pneumonia Shot

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone over the age of 65 which includes most Medicare beneficiaries should get the Pneumovax 23 vaccine.

Who Should Get the Pneumovax 23 Shot?

  • All people age 65 or older
  • Cigarette smokers between the ages of 19 through 64
  • People between 2 and 64 years old with certain medical conditions

The Prevnar 13 vaccine is generally recommended for children younger than 2 years old or for older people with certain medical conditions.

The CDC suggests anyone 65 and older can ask for the Prevnar 13 vaccine if they decide with their doctor that it would be beneficial to them.

The Shot: Pneumonia Vaccine

How often: Depends on your health status.

What to expect: There are two versions of the vaccine PPSV23 and PCV13. Your health status and any underlying conditions determine which version you need, the number of doses, and the timeline that you should receive those doses.

The pneumonia vaccines, PCV13 and PPSV23, prevent infections that can occur from 13 to 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria respectively the efficiency of these vaccines range from 45% to 75%. The pneumonia vaccines are really most relevant for folks who are either older adultswe typically think people more than the age of 50 to 65, or those who are immunosuppressed, Dr. Wolfe says.

Most likely, you will only get the pneumonia shot once in your adulthood or, depending on your longevity, once every five years. They’re obviously less frequent. It’s a good conversation I think people should have with their physician as it comes into September or October and things are starting to cool down, Dr. Wolfe says.

Recommended Reading: Can Mold And Mildew Cause Pneumonia

How Often Should You Get A Pneumonia Shot

If 2020 taught us anything, its the importance of protecting your health. And, while the flu shot and a potential coronavirus vaccine are top of the mind for many people, there are still other vaccinations that can significantly improve your chances of defending yourself from infectious viruses and bacteria. Such is the case with the pneumonia shot. But what, exactly, is pneumonia? When is a vaccine recommended? For how long does its protection last? And, what are the side effects?

Side Effects Of Pneumonia Vaccine

How long should you wait to get the COVID-19 vaccine after getting a pneumonia shot?

As with any medication, there is a risk of side effects from the pneumonia vaccine. However, they are usually harmless. The most common ones include:

  • Low-grade fever
  • Irritation at the site of injection
  • Drowsiness

In babies, its possible to experience additional side effects. These include:

  • Irritability
  • Lack of appetite
  • An inability to fall asleep

Seek medical attention immediately if you or your loved one experience signs of an allergic reaction. These include some or all of the following:

  • Breathing difficulties
  • Swelling of the mouth, lips, and/or tongue
  • Skin rash

Read Also: Why Does My Arm Hurt After Getting A Pneumonia Shot

The Shot: Seasonal Flu Or Influenza Vaccine

How often: Yearly, usually in the fall.

What to expect: It is straightforwardjust a jab in the shoulder.

After hearing about the efficiency rates of the Covid-19 vaccines and their ability to stop variants, you might think that the flu vaccine has some catching up to do. The flu vaccine is maybe 50%, 60%, 70% at best, says Peter Katona, M.D., UCLA Fielding School of Public Health professor of epidemiology and of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine in Los Angeles.

This flu virus is a sneaky bugger that mutates with fervor. Each year, the new flu vaccine is created to protect against a strain of the flu virus that scientists believe will emerge. Some years, they guess right other years, not so much. Either way, any vaccine is better than none, priming your immune system for what might be ahead.

Generally speaking, there are almost no reasons why people shouldn’t be getting a COVID and a flu shot, Dr. Wolfe says. We know they are effective. We know that theyre safe. So, the mere fact that we can’t quite predict how busy the flu season should be, shouldn’t be a reason for folks to put their head in the sand, and think that they shouldnt do it.

What You Need To Know About Pneumonia And Flu Shots

This article was first published in The Montreal Gazette.

Recently, Oprah got pneumonia. Then she went on Ellen to recommend that everyone get their flu and pneumonia shots. Given that only 42 per cent of Canadians over the age of 65 got the pneumonia vaccine in 2016, maybe Oprah can get us over the 80 per cent target.

Sadly, Oprah has not always been a strong advocate for science. She gave a platform to Jenny McCarthy when she started claiming that vaccines caused her sons autism, and she also introduced the world to Dr. Oz.

But as Oprah explained to Ellen, pneumonia is no joke. Around 1.5 million people are hospitalized with pneumonia every year. Around 100,000 die in hospital and a third of people hospitalized with pneumonia die within the year.

Older patients are at greater risk and so are those with pre-existing lung disease. Smoking is also a risk factor for pneumonia, so if you need an extra incentive to stop smoking, this is it. But the main way to prevent pneumonia is with vaccines.

The problem with the pneumonia vaccine is not one of efficacy. A Cochrane meta-analysis of 18 randomized trials found that the pneumonia vaccine led to a substantial reduction in infections. The problem is which pneumonia vaccine to give people.

And if you wont listen to me, at least listen to Oprah.

Want to comment on this article? Visit our FB Page!

Don’t Miss: How Does Pneumonia Sound In Adults

Why Should More Canadian Seniors Get Vaccinated For Pneumonia

This article was published more than 2 years ago. Some information may no longer be current.

The question

I recently turned 65 and went to my family doctor for a checkup. She said I should get a vaccination to protect me from pneumonia. I consider myself to be a relatively fit senior. Why would I need a pneumonia shot?

The answer

Although you may feel and look perfectly fit, your immune system becomes less efficient as you grow older. That means you become increasingly susceptible to infection from Streptococcus pneumoniae, bacteria that normally live in your body.

This type of bacteria can exist in the nose and throat without causing any ill effects most of the time. But among susceptible individuals, the germs can invade the lower parts of the lung, resulting in pneumonia and difficulty breathing. The illness often leads to hospitalization and may be deadly.

The infection, which causes most bacterial pneumonia cases, is preventable with a vaccination. The Public Health Agency of Canada urges everyone older than 65 to get a pneumonia shot and it has set a national target of inoculating 80 per cent of people within this age group.

It also recommends that young children get a similar vaccine because their immature immune systems make them vulnerable to catching the lung infection.

Pneumonia not only ravages the body it can undermine mental health, too.

A common scenario is that pneumonia precipitates another major health problem, Leis says.

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

Asthma and pneumonia: What
  • When should I make an appointment to get each type of pneumococcal vaccine?
  • Should I still get the vaccines if Ive recently had pneumonia?
  • Should I wait to turn 65 before I get each dose of pneumococcal vaccines?
  • If I have a negative reaction to one type of pneumococcal vaccine, am I likely to have that same reaction to the other?

Funding was provided for these pneumococcal resources through an unrestricted grant from Pfizer Independent Grant for Learning and Change .

Read Also: How Often Do I Need To Get Pneumonia Shot

What If You Never Got Prevnar 13 As A Child

Lets say you never got a vaccine for pneumococcal bacteria when you were little . Most of you will just wait until you turn 65 years old, at which time, youll get Prevnar 13 followed by Pneumovax 23 at least 1 year later.

In certain cases, the timing may be different. Your provider will be able to advise you based on your specific situation.

Who Should Get Vaccinated Against It

Three vaccines are now available to help prevent pneumococcal disease. Before the FDA approval of Prevnar 20, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of two other pneumococcal vaccines and . You can read more about them here.

The CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children under 2 years old and all adults at least 65 years old. Although pneumococcal disease can affect people of all ages, younger children and older adults are most at risk.

Depending on vaccination history and the presence of certain medical conditions, other people may also need to receive pneumococcal vaccinations. If you arent sure of your pneumococcal vaccination history, speak to your healthcare provider.

Recommended Reading: Is It Possible To Have Pneumonia Without A Fever

When Is A Pneumonia Vaccine Recommended

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the pneumonia vaccine for all children who are younger than two years of age. It is also recommended for adults who are 56 years of age or older.

There are two types of pneumonia vaccines: pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine . Each vaccine protects against different types of bacteria.

What You Should Know About Pneumonia

Ways you can avoid pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs that typically stems from several kinds of germs, most often bacteria and viruses.

Symptoms can develop gradually or suddenly. They include:

  • Fever.
  • Chest pain.
  • Loss of appetite.

Early detection is often challenging because many people with these symptoms assume they have a cold or the flu.

Its important to also note that the vaccine helps protect against some but not all bacterial pneumonia.

There are dozens of different types of bacterial pneumonia, says Dr. Suri. The vaccine will certainly reduce your risk of the most common bacterial pneumonia.

Don’t Miss: How Do Doctors Diagnose Pneumonia

Who Should Get Prevnar 13 And Pneumovax 23

Prevnar 13 was developed for infants and children. The CDC recommends that all infants and children younger than 2 years of age get Prevnar 13. Prevnar 13 involves a series of four doses of the vaccine given at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and sometime between 12 and 15 months of age.

Pneumovax 23 is the vaccine used in adults. It does not work in infants and children under 2 years old.

Most adults do not need a pneumococcal vaccine until they reach the age of 65. Once a person turns 65 years old, the CDC recommends Pneumovax 23.

The same is true for any adult who smokes or has one or more of these chronic illnesses:

  • Chronic heart disease

  • Chronic lung disease, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  • Diabetes

  • Chronic liver disease

Who Should Not Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

Again, its best to determine this with your doctor, but as a general rule the CDC states you should not get the pneumococcal vaccine if:

  • You or your child has had a severe or life-threatening allergy to the current PCV13 or Prevnar 13®) vaccine, the past PCV7 vaccine or any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid.
  • You or your child are currently battling a severe illness.

Recommended Reading: How To Treat Early Pneumonia

Babies And The Pneumococcal Vaccine

Babies are routinely vaccinated with a type of pneumococcal vaccine known as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as part of their childhood vaccination programme.

Babies born on or after 1 January 2020 have 2 injections, which are usually given at:

  • 12 weeks old
  • 1 year old

Babies born before this date will continue to be offered 3 doses, at 8 and 16 weeks and a booster at 1 year.

What Is Pneumococcal Disease

School Student Immunization Clinics in Allentown

Pneumococcal disease is an infection caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae. This bacteria commonly shortened to pneumococcus is a common cause of pneumonia and other invasive diseases. An invasive disease is when a germ is in a part of the body thats usually germ-free.

Pneumonia is a lung infection that can affect people of all ages. Although pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi, pneumococcus is the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia.

Meningitis a serious infection that surrounds the brain and spinal cord can be caused by a variety of germs, including pneumococcus. Pneumococcus can also cause blood infections , sinus infections, and ear infections.

Pneumococcal vaccines are available to help protect against pneumococcal disease. More on this below.

Don’t Miss: What Treatment Is Used For Pneumonia

What Is The Pneumococcal Vaccine And How Often Should You Get It

Both pneumococcal vaccines approved for use in the United States protect against multiple types of bacteria that can cause pneumonia. The schedule for taking them depends on your age and medical conditions.

Differences Between Pneumococcal Vaccinations

Pneumovax 23
Pneumovax 23 protects against 23 types of serious pneumococcal bacterial infections. Most adults will need only one shot of PPSV23 in their lifetime. But the CDC recommends up to two additional shots for adults with certain chronic medical conditions.
Prevnar 13
Prevnar 13 protects against the 13 most common types of pneumococcal bacteria that cause the most common serious infections in children and adults. Adults will receive this shot only if they have certain medical conditions and with the advice of their doctor. While children receive seven doses by the time they are 15 months old, adults who get this vaccine will only receive one shot of PCV13 in their lifetime.

Popular Articles
Related news