Thursday, September 29, 2022

How Old Should You Be To Get A Pneumonia Shot

Tdap Vaccine And/or The Td Booster

Ask the Expert: Who should get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

Who needs it: The Tdap vaccine came out in 2005, and along with protecting against tetanus and diphtheria, like the vaccine it replaced, it also includes new, additional protection against whooping cough, also known as pertussis. If you cant remember ever getting this shot, you probably need it. And doing so, says Katz, can also count for one of the Td boosters youre supposed to get every 10 years.

How often: You get Tdap only once, and after that, you still need the Td booster every 10 years. Otherwise, your protection against tetanus and diphtheria will fade.

Why you need it: Due to a rise in whooping cough cases in the U.S., you really do need to be vaccinated against it, even if youre over 65. In the first year after getting vaccinated, Tdap prevents the illness in about 7 out of 10 people who received the vaccine.

Talk to your doctor if you: Have epilepsy or other nervous system problems, had severe swelling or pain after a previous dose of either vaccine, or have Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Parting shot: This vaccine is especially crucial for people who have close contact with infants younger than 12 months of age including parents, grandparents, and child care providers.

Persons New To Canada

Health care providers who see persons newly arrived in Canada should review the immunization status and update immunization for these individuals, as necessary. Review of pneumococcal vaccination status is particularly important for persons from areas of the world where sickle cell disease is present, as persons with sickle cell disease are at risk of serious pneumococcal infections. In many countries outside of Canada, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is in limited use. Refer to Immunization of Persons New to Canada in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of people who are new to Canada.

Babies And The Pneumococcal Vaccine

Babies are routinely vaccinated with a type of pneumococcal vaccine known as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as part of their childhood vaccination programme.

Babies born on or after 1 January 2020 have 2 injections, which are usually given at:

  • 12 weeks old
  • 1 year old

Babies born before this date will continue to be offered 3 doses, at 8 and 16 weeks and a booster at 1 year.

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Path To Improved Health

Pneumococcal vaccines can protect you against getting pneumonia, which is contagious and spreads from close, person-to-person contact. Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs and can lead to many symptoms, including:

  • cough
  • chest pains
  • bringing up mucus when you cough

For seniors, pneumonia can be very serious and life-threatening. This is especially true if you have a chronic condition, such as diabetes or COPD. Pneumonia can also develop after youve had a case of the flu or a respiratory virus such as COVID-19. It is extremely important to stay current on flu shots each year in addition to your pneumococcal vaccines.

While PPSV23 and PCV13 do not protect against all types of pneumonia, they can make it less likely that you will experience severe and possibly life-threatening complications from the illness.

The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends that seniors who have not had either pneumococcal vaccine should get a dose of PCV13 first, and then a dose of PPSV23 6-12 months later. The vaccines cannot be given at the same time. If you have recently had a dose of PPSV23, your doctor will wait at least one year to give you PCV13.

Signs Of Pneumonia Vaccine Side Effects

Pneumococcal Vaccination in Seniors

As with any vaccination, there are potential side effects of the pneumonia vaccination. Common side effects include:

Injection site soreness

As with most shots and vaccinations, you may experience pain, swelling, or redness at the injection site .

Less than 1% of people who receive a pneumonia vaccine develop a fever. If your temperature is above 100.4 F , you have a fever.

Irritability

Irritability is a feeling of agitation. When you’re feeling irritable, you’re more likely to become frustrated or upset. In children, this may present as fussiness.

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Who Should Get Pneumococcal Vaccines

CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger than 2 years old and all adults 65 years or older. In certain situations, older children and other adults should also get pneumococcal vaccines. Below is more information about who should and should not get each type of pneumococcal vaccine.

Talk to your or your childs doctor about what is best for your specific situation.

Questions To Ask Your Doctor

  • When should I make an appointment to get each type of pneumococcal vaccine?
  • Should I still get the vaccines if Ive recently had pneumonia?
  • Should I wait to turn 65 before I get each dose of pneumococcal vaccines?
  • If I have a negative reaction to one type of pneumococcal vaccine, am I likely to have that same reaction to the other?

Funding was provided for these pneumococcal resources through an unrestricted grant from Pfizer Independent Grant for Learning and Change .

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Side Effects Of The Vaccines Against Pneumococcal Disease

Vaccines against pneumococcal disease are effective and safe, although all medications can have unwanted side effects.

Side effects from the vaccine are uncommon and usually mild, but may include:

  • localised pain, redness and swelling at the injection site
  • occasionally, an injection-site lump that may last many weeks
  • low-grade temperature .

Who Should Not Get Vaccinated Or Should Wait

Pneumonia Can Be PreventedVaccines Can Help Older Adults

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Who Shouldn’t Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

If you don’t meet the recommendations for the pneumonia vaccine, you really don’t need to get it, pulmonary critical care expert Reynold Panettieri, MD, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Science at Rutgers University, tells Health. “It’s a risk-benefit ratio,” he explains. “If you’re under 65 and are otherwise healthy, your likelihood of developing pneumococcal pneumonia is unlikely,” he says.

But there are some people who explicitly shouldn’t get the vaccines, per the CDC. Those include:

  • People who have had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PCV13, PPSV23, an early pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7, the DTaP vaccine, or any parts of these vaccines. Talk to your doctor if you’re unsure.
  • People who are currently ill.

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Types Of Pneumonia Vaccine

There are two vaccines which can provide protection against Streptococcus pneumoniae. They cannot prevent other types of bacterial pneumonia or any associated with a fungus or virus.

The two FDA-approved vaccines immunize a person against the specific serotypes that are most likely to cause illness and invasive disease. They are:

  • PCV13, marketed under the name Prevnar 13,which prevents 13 of the most severe types of S. pneumoniae
  • PPSV23, marketed under the name Pneumovax 23, which protects against an additional 23 S. pneumoniae serotypes

Neither vaccine is made from a live or whole bacteria but rather parts of the bacterial shell. While these components cannot cause disease, the immune system recognizes them as threats and triggers a defensive response in the same way it would to a real bacteria.

The PVC13 vaccine is delivered intramuscularly either into the deltoid muscle of the upper arm or the vastus lateralis muscle of the external thigh. The PPSV23 shot can either be given intramuscularly or subcutaneously .

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Problems That Could Happen After Getting Any Injected Vaccine

  • People sometimes faint after a medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you or your child:
  • Feel dizzy
  • Have vision changes
  • Have ringing in the ears
  • Some people get severe pain in the shoulder and have difficulty moving the arm where the doctor gave the shot. This happens very rarely.
  • Any medicine can cause a severe allergic reaction. Such reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at about 1 in a million shots. These types of reactions would happen within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.
  • As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.
  • Everything You Need To Know About The Pneumonia Vaccine

    COVID

    During the winter months, many people think that they have a nasty cold or flu, but it turns out to be pneumonia an illness that can be life threatening in certain people. A vaccine can help lower your chance of contracting pneumonia. While the pneumonia vaccine does not prevent all cases of pneumonia, it reduces the severity of the disease.

    That is especially important for older adults and if you have certain medical conditions that put you at greater risk for complications.

    Now is the time to talk to your doctor about your risks and if you need a vaccine to protect you against pneumonia.

    Niharika Juwarkar, MD, Internal Medicine with Firelands Physician Group, answers your most frequently asked questions about pneumonia and the risks.

    What is pneumonia?

    Pneumonia is a respiratory lung infection that is often mistaken for the flu. Your lungs become filled with fluid or pus that results in inflammation. Symptoms are very similar to the flu, but pneumonia can last for weeks and result in very serious complications.

    While pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi, most cases are due to a specific bacteria called streptococcus pneumoniae, more commonly known as pneumococcal pneumonia. This form can be treated with antibiotics. Your doctor can test to see what form of pneumonia you have. Treatment depends on the type of pneumonia you have and the severity of your symptoms. But, the best defense is vaccination.

    Who is most at risk for pneumonia?

    Read Also: Signs Or Symptoms Of Pneumonia

    How Do I We Get The Vaccine

    In Canada, all provinces and territories provide the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, starting at 2 months of age. While the exact schedule will depend on where you live, usually two shots are given between 2 and 11 months of age and a booster at 12-15 months. Children at high risk of disease are given three shots , as well as the booster.

    Unvaccinated children between 15 months and 5 years old should also get the vaccine. Your doctor or public health unit can tell you the number of shots your child will need and when.

    All unvaccinated children and adolescents who are at high risk of serious infection should receive both the conjugate and the polysaccharide vaccine. The polysaccharide vaccine is at given at age 2 or later, with a booster 5 years after the first.

    Booster Doses Of Pneumococcal Vaccine

    If you’re at increased risk of a pneumococcal infection, you’ll be given a single dose of the PPV vaccine.

    But if your spleen does not work properly or you have a chronic kidney condition, you may need booster doses of PPV every 5 years.

    This is because your levels of antibodies against the infection decrease over time.

    Your GP surgery will advise you on whether you’ll need a booster dose.

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    Children At High Risk Of Ipd

    Infants at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition should receive Pneu-C-13 vaccine in a 4 dose schedule at 2 months, 4 months and 6 months followed by a dose at 12 to 15 months of age. Table 3 summarizes the recommended schedules for Pneu-C-13 vaccine for infants and children at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition by pneumococcal conjugate vaccination history.

    In addition to Pneu-C-13 vaccine, children at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition should receive 1 dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine at 24 months of age, at least 8 weeks after Pneu-C-13 vaccine. If an older child or adolescent at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition has not previously received Pneu-P-23 vaccine, 1 dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine should be administered, at least 8 weeks after Pneu-C-13 vaccine. Children and adolescents at highest risk of IPD should receive 1 booster dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine refer to Booster doses and re-immunization. Refer to Immunocompromised persons for information about immunization of HSCT recipients.

    Table 3: Recommended Schedules for Pneu-C-13 Vaccine for Children 2 months to less than 18 years of age, by Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination History

    Age at presentation for immunizationNumber of doses of Pneu-C-7, Pneu-C-10 or Pneu-C-13 previously received

    Who Should Get Prevnar 13 And Pneumovax 23

    Concerns about lung infection from coronavirus raise questions about pneumonia vaccine

    Prevnar 13 was developed for infants and children. The CDC recommends that all infants and children younger than 2 years of age get Prevnar 13. Prevnar 13 involves a series of four doses of the vaccine given at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and sometime between 12 and 15 months of age.

    Pneumovax 23 is the vaccine used in adults. It does not work in infants and children under 2 years old.

    Most adults do not need a pneumococcal vaccine until they reach the age of 65. Once a person turns 65 years old, the CDC recommends Pneumovax 23.

    The same is true for any adult who smokes or has one or more of these chronic illnesses:

    • Chronic heart disease

    • Chronic lung disease, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    • Diabetes

    • Chronic liver disease

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    Are You 65 Or Older Get Two Vaccinations Against Pneumonia

    • By Gregory Curfman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Former Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Health Publishing

    ARCHIVED CONTENT: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date each article was posted or last reviewed. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

    If you or a loved one is age 65 or older, getting vaccinated against pneumonia is a good idea so good that the Centers for Disease Control now recommends that everyone in this age group get vaccinated against pneumonia twice.

    This new recommendation is based on findings from a large clinical trial called CAPiTA, which were published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, sometimes just called pneumococcus, is a common bacterium that can cause serious lung infections like pneumonia. It can also cause invasive infections of the bloodstream, the tissues covering the brain and spinal cord , and other organs and tissues. Older individuals are especially prone to being infected by Pneumococcus, and these infections are often deadly.

    The dark spots are pneumonia-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria isolated from the blood of an infected person.

    One caveat is that while PCV13 is effective in preventing pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae, it does not prevent pneumonia caused by viruses or other bacteria.

    Older Adults Still Need Their Shots For The Flu Shingles And More

    As we age, the immune system slows down, chronic conditions become more common, and the body may be less able to fight off infection and more vulnerable to its complications.

    Thats where vaccines come in. These immunity boosters help prevent serious diseases at any age.

    Vaccines are not only for kids or teens, says David Kim, M.D., director of the division of vaccines and immunization at the Department of Health and Human Services. If youre older, youre at a higher risk for certain vaccine-preventable diseases.

    Here are the shots you may need, when to get them, and why theyre critical for keeping you and your loved ones healthy.

    Read Also: How Often Should Elderly Get Pneumonia Shot

    Pneumonia And Long Covid

    In a Q& A about lingering COVID-19 symptoms, the Cleveland Clinic notes that it is seemingly random who experiences long-lasting symptoms and who doesn’t. So, its not quite clear whether having pneumonia in the past is connected with having long COVID.

    As a way to find answers, in 2021, the National Institutes of Health launched an ongoing study into the underlying biological causes of prolonged symptoms and what makes some people more likely to get long COVID.

    Whats The Difference Between Pcv13 And Ppsv23

    incredible hulk suffers vaccine injury prepforthat
    PCV13
    helps protect you against 13 different strains of pneumococcal bacteriahelps protect you against 23 different strains of pneumococcal bacteria
    usually given four separate times to children under twogenerally given once to anyone over 64
    generally given only once to adults older than 64 or adults older than 19 if they have an immune conditiongiven to anyone over 19 who regularly smokes nicotine products like cigarettes or cigars
    • Both vaccines help prevent pneumococcal complications like bacteremia and meningitis.
    • Youll need more than one pneumonia shot during your lifetime. A 2016 study found that, if youre over 64, receiving both the PCV13 shot and the PPSV23 shot provide the best protection against all the strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia.
    • Dont get the shots too close together. Youll need to wait about a year in between each shot.
    • Check with your doctor to make sure youre not allergic to any of the ingredients used to make these vaccines before getting either shot.
    • a vaccine made with diphtheria toxoid
    • another version of the shot called PCV7
    • any previous injections of a pneumonia shot
    • are allergic to any ingredients in the shot
    • have had severe allergies to a PPSV23 shot in the past
    • are very sick

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    Immunisation Against Pneumococcal Disease For Babies And Children

    The immunisation schedule for babies involves a course of a primary vaccine that reduces the risk of infection with 13 strains of pneumococcal bacteria.

    A second type of vaccine that reduces the risk of infection with 23 strains of pneumococcal bacteria is given as a booster dose to children from four years of age if they:

    • have a medical condition putting them at high risk of pneumococcal disease, or
    • were born prematurely before 28 weeks gestation.

    Protection for babies and children against pneumococcal disease is available under the National Immunisation Program Schedule. In Victoria, immunisation against pneumococcal disease is free of charge for:

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