Sunday, September 25, 2022

Is There A Vaccine For Pneumonia

How Often Do You Need To Get The Pneumonia Vaccines

There’s a new pneumonia vaccine for adults

Sometimes, vaccines require a booster shot. This means that an additional shot is given after the initial one to make sure that you dont lose immunity over time.

PCV13 never requires a booster shot in children or adults after all recommended doses are received.

Sometimes, PPSV23 requires a booster shot, depending on when and why it was given:

  • Children who get PPSV23 due to certain health conditions, like cancer and conditions that weaken the immune system, need a booster 5 years after the first dose.

  • Adults who get PPSV23 before age 65 should get one booster at least 5 years after the first dose, once theyve turned 65. No booster is needed if the first dose is given after age 65.

  • Adults with a weakened immune system and other specific conditions should have another dose 5 years after their first dose, and then one more dose at least 5 years after their most recent dose, once theyve turned 65.

Pneumococcal Surface Protein A

Pneumococcal surface protein A is an antibody-accessible surface protein attached non-covalently via binding to choline residues in lipoteichoic acid and cell wall teichoic acid on the pneumococcal surface. PspA has been found on all clinical isolates and is necessary for pneumococcal virulence. It aids pneumococcus in escaping complement-dependent immune phagocytosis both by inhibiting the deposition of complement on the surface of the bacterium and by inhibiting the killing of pneumococcus by the innate immune molecule lactoferrin., The N-terminal coiled-coil region of the protein can be divided into seven immunologically unique families. This region has been studied extensively for its ability to elicit an antibody-mediated, protective immune response against pneumococcal infection in mice. Immunization with this protein in humans elicits antibodies that are capable of passively protecting mice against infection. Vaccine antigen research has focused on this portion of the protein because it is farthest from the C-terminal choline-binding repeats that anchor the protein and was thus hypothesized to be the most accessible to antibodies.

How The Pneumococcal Vaccine Works

Both types of pneumococcal vaccine encourage your body to produce antibodies against pneumococcal bacteria.

Antibodies are proteins produced by the body to neutralise or destroy disease-carrying organisms and toxins.

They protect you from becoming ill if you’re infected with the bacteria.

More than 90 different strains of the pneumococcal bacterium have been identified, although most of these strains do not cause serious infections.

The childhood vaccine protects against 13 strains of the pneumococcal bacterium, while the adult vaccine protects against 23 strains.

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Influenza And Pneumococcal Immunization

Everyone plays a role in infection preventionpatients, families, and healthcare personnelin and out of healthcare facilities.

So do your part! Wherever you are, there is something you can do to stay safe from infections.

Two things that you can do for yourself and your loved ones are to receive an influenza vaccine annually and a pneumonia immunization at the appropriate time according to your age and health history. By doing so, you not only protect yourself, but you protect others who are vulnerable to severe illness or even death if they get one of these viruses.

Influenza immunization

Flu activity usually peaks in the U.S. in January or February. However, seasonal flu activity can begin as early as October and continue to occur as late as May. Flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza virus. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications. Even healthy people can get sick enough to miss work or school for a significant amount of time or even be hospitalized. Learn the flu basics.

What Is The Pneumonia Shot

Pneumonia Vaccine May Not Be Necessary for Older Adults

The pneumonia shot is a vaccine that keeps you from getting pneumonia. There are two types of vaccines. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is primarily for children under age two, though it can be given to older ages, as well. The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is for adults over age 65.

The pneumonia vaccine for older adults is one dose. Unlike the flu vaccine, you dont get it every year.

The vaccine teaches your body to make proteins that will destroy the pneumonia bacteria. These proteins are called antibodies and they will protect you and keep you from getting infected. The pneumonia vaccines dont have live bacteria or viruses in them, so you wont get pneumonia from the vaccine.

Continued

You should have the pneumonia vaccine if you:

  • Are over age 65
  • Have a long-term health problem
  • Asthma
  • Have a weak immune system
  • Smoke
  • Vaccines dont prevent all pneumonia, but people who get the shot dont get as sick as those who dont have it. Benefits of the vaccine include:

    • Milder infections
    • Ringing in your ears
    • Sweating

    If you know you dont like needles or feel worried before getting a vaccine, you can try to look away while you have the shot. You can also try a relaxation technique like deep breathing or visualization to help you feel calm.

    Older people are more likely to have long-term health problems that can make getting an infection dangerous. The pneumonia shot is recommended for most people.

    Continued

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    Who Should Not Get These Vaccines

    Because of age or health conditions, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines below specific to pneumococcal vaccines and ask your or your childs doctor for more information.

    Children younger than 2 years old should not get PPSV23. In addition, tell the person who is giving you or your child a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine if:

    You or your child have had a life-threatening allergic reaction or have a severe allergy.

    • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any of the following should not get PCV13:
    • A shot of this vaccine
    • An earlier pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7
    • Any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid
  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PPSV23 should not get another shot.
  • Anyone with a severe allergy to any part of either of these vaccines should not get that vaccine. Your or your childs doctor can tell you about the vaccines ingredients.
  • You or your child are not feeling well.

    • People who have a mild illness, such as a cold, can probably get vaccinated. People who have a more serious illness should probably wait until they recover. Your or your childs doctor can advise you.

    What Is The Pneumonia Vaccine Exactly

    The pneumonia vaccine helps prevent pneumococcal disease, which is any kind of illness caused by the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. That includes pneumonia and meningitis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . There are actually two types of pneumococcal vaccines in the US:

    • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, known as PCV13
    • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, known as PPSV23

    PCV13 protects against 13 types of bacteria that cause pneumococcal disease, the CDC says, and specifically works against the most serious types of pneumococcal disease, including pneumonia, meningitis, and bacteremia. PPSV23 protects against 23 types of bacteria that cause pneumococcal disease and helps prevent infections like meningitis and bacteremia.

    The pneumococcal vaccines can be lifesaving. Pneumococcal pneumonia kills about one in 20 older adults who get it, according to the CDC. The vaccines offer a lot of protection. PCV13 can protect three in four adults ages 65 and up against invasive pneumococcal disease and nine in 20 adults ages 65 and older against pneumococcal pneumonia, per CDC data. One shot of PPSV23 protects up to 17 in 20 healthy adults against invasive pneumococcal disease.

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    Babies And The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Babies are routinely vaccinated with a type of pneumococcal vaccine known as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as part of their childhood vaccination programme.

    Babies born on or after 1 January 2020 have 2 injections, which are usually given at:

    • 12 weeks old
    • 1 year old

    Babies born before this date will continue to be offered 3 doses, at 8 and 16 weeks and a booster at 1 year.

    What You Should Know About Pneumonia

    One more vaccine to consider — pneumonia

    Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs that typically stems from several kinds of germs, most often bacteria and viruses.

    Symptoms can develop gradually or suddenly. They include:

    • Fever.
    • Chest pain.
    • Loss of appetite.

    Early detection is often challenging because many people with these symptoms assume they have a cold or the flu.

    Its important to also note that the vaccine helps protect against some but not all bacterial pneumonia.

    There are dozens of different types of bacterial pneumonia, says Dr. Suri. The vaccine will certainly reduce your risk of the most common bacterial pneumonia.

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    How Do You Get Immunised Against Pneumococcal Disease

    You can only get pneumococcal vaccines on their own, not as a combination vaccine. Different vaccines protect against different types of pneumococcal disease. They are all given as a needle.

    There are 2 types of pneumococcal vaccine:

    The type of vaccine used and the dosage schedule will depend on age and any conditions that put people at higher risk of getting pneumococcal disease. Your doctor can tell you which vaccine they will use for your pneumococcal immunisation.

    This Infectious Disease Can Pose A Serious Health Risk For Those Age 65 And Older But Two Vaccines Can Offer Sound Protection

    One of the leading health dangers for older adults is pneumonia. It is the most common cause of hospital admissions after childbirth. In fact, adults age 65 and older have a higher risk of death from pneumonia hospitalization than any other reason.

    Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs by bacteria, viruses, or other microbes. Most cases are caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumonia, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Legionella pneumophila. A similar inflammation of the lung, called pneumonitis, can be caused by an inhaled chemical and is more common in people who have had strokes and have difficulty swallowing. A physical exam, chest x-ray, and blood test can confirm a diagnosis.

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    Do I Need To Pay For Pneumococcal Immunisation

    Vaccines covered by the National Immunisation Program are free for people who are eligible. See the NIP Schedule to find out which vaccines you or your family are eligible to receive.

    Eligible people get the vaccine for free, but your health care provider may charge a consultation fee for the visit. You can check this when you make your appointment.

    If you are not eligible for free vaccine, you may need to pay for it. The cost depends on the type of vaccine, the formula and where you buy it from. Your immunisation provider can give you more information.

    Do The Pneumonia Vaccines Work

    This New Vaccine Can Really Prevent Killer Pneumonia

    The pneumococcal vaccines are very effective at preventing pneumonia and other pneumococcal diseases in both adults and children. In one large study of over 84,000 adults aged 65 and older, those who received PCV13 were less likely to get pneumococcal pneumonia than were those who received a placebo shot. The vaccine protected about 45% of vaccinated people from getting pneumonia and about 75% from getting an invasive pneumococcal disease. Invasive pneumococcal disease is the most serious type and can be life-threatening.

    PPSV23 is also effective and protects at least 50% of vaccinated, healthy adults from invasive pneumococcal infections.

    In children, PCV13 has decreased the amount of invasive pneumococcal disease. According to the CDC, PCV13 prevented about 30,000 cases of invasive disease in the first 3 years it was available.

    Getting the vaccine not only protects you from getting pneumonia and other types of pneumococcal disease, but also protects vulnerable people around you who cant get vaccinated.

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    Who Should Not Get The Vaccine

    People should not get the vaccine if they have had a life threatening allergic reaction to a previous dose.

    Additionally, a person should not undergo vaccination if they have had an allergic reaction to medication containing diphtheria toxoid or an earlier form of the pneumonia vaccination .

    Lastly, people who are sick or have allergic reactions to any of the ingredients of the vaccine should talk to a doctor before getting the shot.

    A pneumonia shot will not reduce pneumonia. However, it helps prevent invasive pneumococcal diseases, such as meningitis, endocarditis, empyema, and bacteremia, which is when bacteria enter the bloodstream.

    Noninvasive pneumococcal disease includes sinusitis.

    There are two types of pneumonia shots available. Which type a person gets depends on their age, whether or not they smoke, and the presence of any underlying medical conditions.

    The two types are:

    • Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine : Healthcare providers recommend this vaccine for young children, people with certain underlying conditions, and some people over the age of 65 years.
    • Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine : Healthcare providers recommend this vaccine for anyone over 65 years of age, people with certain underlying conditions, and people who smoke.

    According to the

    • roughly 8 in 10 babies from invasive pneumococcal disease
    • 45 in 100 adults 65 years or older against pneumococcal pneumonia
    • 75 in 100 adults 65 years or older against invasive pneumococcal disease

    Who Should Get Prevnar 13 And Pneumovax 23

    Prevnar 13 was developed for infants and children. The CDC recommends that all infants and children younger than 2 years of age get Prevnar 13. Prevnar 13 involves a series of four doses of the vaccine given at 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and sometime between 12 and 15 months of age.

    Pneumovax 23 is the vaccine used in adults. It does not work in infants and children under 2 years old.

    Most adults do not need a pneumococcal vaccine until they reach the age of 65. Once a person turns 65 years old, the CDC recommends Pneumovax 23.

    The same is true for any adult who smokes or has one or more of these chronic illnesses:

    • Chronic heart disease

    • Chronic lung disease, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    • Diabetes

    • Chronic liver disease

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    Booster Doses Of Pneumococcal Vaccine

    If you’re at increased risk of a pneumococcal infection, you’ll be given a single dose of the PPV vaccine.

    But if your spleen does not work properly or you have a chronic kidney condition, you may need booster doses of PPV every 5 years.

    This is because your levels of antibodies against the infection decrease over time.

    Your GP surgery will advise you on whether you’ll need a booster dose.

    What Are The Pneumonia Vaccines

    Ask the Expert: Who should get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

    There are two FDA-approved vaccines that protect against pneumonia:

    • 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, or PCV13

    • 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, or PPSV23

    These immunizations are called pneumonia vaccines because they prevent pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. They are also known as pneumococcal vaccines because they protect against a bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus. Although there are many viruses, bacteria, and fungi that cause pneumonia, pneumococcus is the most common cause. Pneumococcus can also cause infections in other parts of the body.

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    Who Should Get Immunised Against Pneumococcal Disease

    Anyone who wants to protect themselves against pneumococcal disease can talk to their doctor about getting immunised.

    Pneumococcal immunisation is recommended for:

    • infants and children aged under 5 years
    • non-Indigenous adults aged 70 years and over without medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged under 5 years living in Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults aged 50 years and over without medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • infants under 12 months diagnosed with certain medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease
    • people over 12 months with certain medical risk conditions for pneumococcal disease

    There are two types of pneumococcal vaccine provided free under the National Immunisation Program for different age groups and circumstances:

    Refer to the NIP schedule for vaccine dosage information. Your doctor or vaccination provider will advise if you or your child have a specified medical risk condition.

    Refer to the pneumococcal recommendations in the Australian Immunisation Handbook for more information.

    What To Know About Mild Side Effects

    As with any vaccine, you may experience some mild side effects after receiving the pneumococcal vaccine.

    Mild side effects vary depending on which vaccine you receive. The side effects will usually go away within a few days.

    Possible side effects of the PCV13 vaccine include:

    • redness or discoloration, pain, or swelling at the site of the shot
    • sleepiness or drowsiness
    • mild fever

    On very rare occasions, serious side effects can occur, such as high fever, convulsions, or a skin rash. Contact your childs pediatrician right away if you notice any of these symptoms.

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    Effectiveness Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Children respond very well to the pneumococcal vaccine.

    The introduction of this vaccine into the NHS childhood vaccination schedule has resulted in a large reduction in pneumococcal disease.

    The pneumococcal vaccine given to older children and adults is thought to be around 50 to 70% effective at preventing pneumococcal disease.

    Both types of pneumococcal vaccine are inactivated or “killed” vaccines and do not contain any live organisms. They cannot cause the infections they protect against.

    What About The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Senior citizens to get free anti

    Prevnar 13 is a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine that protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria.

    Pneumovax 23 is a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria.

    Once vaccinated, most healthy adults develop protection to most or all of these types within two to three weeks.

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