Monday, September 26, 2022

Pneumonia Shot 13 Vs 23

Should Adults Over 65 Get Prevnar 13

Ask the Expert: Who should get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

PCV13 is still a safe and effective vaccine, especially if you have medical conditions or live in a place with high risk of exposure to pneumococcal strains, such as a nursing home or long-term care facility. Doctors and their patients need to consider both the exposure risk and personal risks for each patient to decide whether Prevnar 13 is necessary. If you have questions about either vaccine, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Find discounts on pneumonia vaccines from ScriptSave WellRx.

According to the CDC, only about 70% of adults aged 65 and older ever receive a pneumococcal vaccination, either PCV13 or PPSV23. Hopefully, the new recommendations will encourage more people to get vaccinated since healthy adults now only need a single dose rather than two doses.

Whats The Difference Between Pcv13 And Ppsv23

PCV13
helps protect you against 13 different strains of pneumococcal bacteriahelps protect you against 23 different strains of pneumococcal bacteria
usually given four separate times to children under twogenerally given once to anyone over 64
generally given only once to adults older than 64 or adults older than 19 if they have an immune conditiongiven to anyone over 19 who regularly smokes nicotine products like cigarettes or cigars
  • Both vaccines help prevent pneumococcal complications like bacteremia and meningitis.
  • Youll need more than one pneumonia shot during your lifetime. A 2016 study found that, if youre over 64, receiving both the PCV13 shot and the PPSV23 shot provide the best protection against all the strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia.
  • Dont get the shots too close together. Youll need to wait about a year in between each shot.
  • Check with your doctor to make sure youre not allergic to any of the ingredients used to make these vaccines before getting either shot.
  • a vaccine made with diphtheria toxoid
  • another version of the shot called PCV7
  • any previous injections of a pneumonia shot
  • are allergic to any ingredients in the shot
  • have had severe allergies to a PPSV23 shot in the past
  • are very sick

Summary Of Naci Statement: Interim Recommendations On The Use Of Pneumococcal Vaccines In Immunocompetent Adults 65 Years Of Age And Older

Quach C1, Baclic O2 on behalf of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization *

1 NACI Pneumococcal Working Group Chair, Montréal, QC

2 Centre for Immunization and Respiratory Infectious Diseases, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON

Quach C, Baclic O on behalf of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization . Summary of NACI Statement: Interim Recommendations on the Use of Pneumococcal Vaccines in Immunocompetent Adults 65 Years of Age and Older. Can Comm Dis Rep 2016 42:260-2. https://doi.org/10.14745/ccdr.v42i12a05

Also Check: Pneumonia Shot Schedule For Adults

Other Types Of Pneumococcal Disease

Pneumonia vaccines protect against pneumococcal infections in other parts of the body. These infections include:

Otitis media

  • What is it: An infection in the middle part of the ear.

  • Symptoms: Fever, ear pain, and decreased hearing

  • Who gets it: In the U.S., over 5 million children get it each year. Pneumococcus is a common cause of ear infections. It is found in up to 30% of samples of middle ear fluid.

Sinusitis

  • What is it: A sinus infection, which is often first caused by a virus. Later, a bacterial infection can set in, causing worsening or ongoing symptoms.

  • Symptoms: Pain and pressure around the eyes and nose, fever, drainage, and congestion

  • Who gets it: Sinus infections are more common in adults than in children. Pneumococcus is a common cause and may contribute to up to 35% of sinus infections.

Meningitis

  • What is it: An infection of the leptomeninges, or the tissue surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Meningitis can be life-threatening, so getting immediate treatment is important.

  • Symptoms: Fever, confusion, headache, and neck stiffness

  • Who gets it: Pneumococcal meningitis usually occurs in very young children and older adults. In the U.S., pneumococcus is the most common cause of bacterial meningitis in children under age 5.

Bacteremia

These infections can also be caused by other bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumococcus, the pneumococcal vaccines, is only one cause.

Persons With Inadequate Immunization Records

Use of 13

Children and adults lacking adequate documentation of immunization should be considered unimmunized and should be started on an immunization schedule appropriate for their age and risk factors. Pneumococcal vaccines may be given, regardless of possible previous receipt of the vaccines, as adverse events associated with repeated immunization have not been demonstrated. Refer to Immunization of Persons with Inadequate Immunization Records in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of people with inadequate immunization records.

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Vii Surveillance And Research Priorities

The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease is changing in Canada and elsewhere, both due to and independent of the use of pneumococcal vaccines. Ongoing changes are expected as PNEU-C-13 vaccines are used routinely in childhood vaccination programs. Nationwide surveillance systems to detect these changes over time are essential. Optimal decisions about the use of pneumococcal vaccines requires ongoing surveillance for serotype-specific rates of invasive pneumococcal disease, and other disease syndromes, serotype-specific estimates of the efficacy of different vaccines, and continuing assessment of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different vaccination schedules over time.

Surveillance and research which addresses the following outstanding questions is particularly encouraged:

Are The Pneumonia Vaccines Safe

Yes, pneumonia vaccines are safe. Like all vaccines, they go through rigorous scientific testing and review. Although both pneumococcal vaccines can cause mild side effects, severe reactions to the vaccines are rare. In one study of adults over age 70 who received the PCV13 and PPSV23 vaccines, there was only one adverse event that was related to the vaccine.

Allergic reactions to vaccines are rare, but they can occur and may be serious. If you have had an allergic reaction to one of the ingredients in the pneumococcal vaccines or to a prior dose of a pneumococcal vaccine, you should not get vaccinated without talking to your healthcare provider first.

If you have questions about whether the pneumonia vaccines are safe for you, discuss this with your healthcare provider. You can also find information about pneumococcal vaccine safety here.

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Concurrent Administration Of Vaccines

Pneumococcal vaccines may be administered concomitantly with other vaccines, with the exception of a different formulation of pneumococcal vaccine . There should be at least an 8 week interval between a dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and a subsequent dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine, and at least a 1 year interval between a dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine and a subsequent dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine refer to Immunocompromised persons for information regarding administration of pneumococcal vaccines to HSCT recipients. Different injection sites and separate needles and syringes must be used for concurrent parenteral injections. Refer to Timing of Vaccine Administration in Part 1 for additional information about concurrent administration of vaccines.

Who Should Get Vaccinated Against It

NEW 2019 Pneumococcal Vaccine Recommendations! | 5 Minute Medicine

Three vaccines are now available to help prevent pneumococcal disease. Before the FDA approval of Prevnar 20, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the use of two other pneumococcal vaccines and . You can read more about them here.

The CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children under 2 years old and all adults at least 65 years old. Although pneumococcal disease can affect people of all ages, younger children and older adults are most at risk.

Depending on vaccination history and the presence of certain medical conditions, other people may also need to receive pneumococcal vaccinations. If you arent sure of your pneumococcal vaccination history, speak to your healthcare provider.

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Prevnar 13 Vs Pneumovax 2: Differences Similarities And Which Is Better For You

Drug overview & main differences | Conditions treated | Efficacy | Insurance coverage and cost comparison | Side effects | Drug interactions | Warnings | FAQ

Pneumonia is an infection of one or both lung, which can be life-threatening, especially in infants and children, patients who are immunocompromised, and adults over 65. According to the CDC, about 50,000 people die in the US every year from pneumonia. Prevnar 13 and Pneumovax 23 are two brand-name vaccines approved by the FDA. Both vaccines are used to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and its complications, but they have some differences such as how they are administered, and the types of bacteria they protect against. Lets compare the two below.

Where Can You Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

Once you know one of the pneumonia vaccines is right for you or your family, you may wonder where to get it. These vaccines are commonly available at medical offices and hospitals, so you might be able to get one where you see your healthcare provider. If they do not have it, many pharmacies, including CVS and Walgreens locations, have the vaccine. Your local health department is also a good resource and often gives vaccinations.

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What Are The Pneumonia Vaccines

There are two FDA-approved vaccines that protect against pneumonia:

  • 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, or PCV13

  • 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, or PPSV23

These immunizations are called pneumonia vaccines because they prevent pneumonia, which is an infection in the lungs. They are also known as pneumococcal vaccines because they protect against a bacteria called Streptococcus pneumoniae, or pneumococcus. Although there are many viruses, bacteria, and fungi that cause pneumonia, pneumococcus is the most common cause. Pneumococcus can also cause infections in other parts of the body.

How Long Does A Pneumonia Shot Last

Update on the use of 13

Streptococcus pneumoniaevaccinepneumoniaStreptococcus pneumoniae

  • Younger than 2 years old: four shots
  • 65 years old or older: two shots, which will last you the rest of your life
  • Between 2 and 64 years old: between one and three shots if you have certain immune system disorders or if youre a smoker

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Summary Of The Issues

Pneumonia infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortalityworldwide, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is currently the most commonly identifiedpathogen in community-acquired pneumonia. In the United States, S. pneumoniae is responsible for500,000 cases of pneumonia and 50,000 cases of bacteremia each year with an annualmortality rate of 57% and 20%, respectively. Pneumococcal disease in all of itsforms is estimated to cause 1.6 million deaths globally per year. In addition to the public healthconcerns, pneumonia also accounts for a significant cost to the health caresystem.

Currently there are two leading vaccines targeted against S. pneumoniae:23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and 13-valent pneumococcalconjugate vaccine . Pneumococci bacteria are contained within apolysaccharide capsule. The capsules contain antigenic variation, and over 90distinct capsular serotypes have been identified. PPSV23 contains antigens from 23common serotypes, while PCV13 contains antigens from 13 serotypes. Although both vaccines aim to induceimmunity against the most common serotypes to cause clinical disease, there issubstantial overlap in the antigens contained within each vaccine. Twelve of thethirteen serotypes included in PCV13 are common to PPSV23.

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How Much Will It Cost

At this time, Prevnar 20s list price hasnt been announced. However, this vaccine will likely be common for older adults, and its expected that Medicare will cover the bill. Pneumococcal vaccines are a cost-free benefit of Medicare Part B, and people with original Medicare or Medicare Advantage can receive covered pneumococcal vaccines with specific providers.

If you have Medicaid, check with your state Medicaid agency to see which vaccines are offered. Many Medicaid plans pay for some vaccines, but specific coverage varies.

All Health Insurance Marketplace plans and many private plans cover pneumococcal vaccines when provided by an in-network provider, but costs can vary depending on the specific insurance plan.

For people without insurance or adequate coverage, financial assistance and coupon programs may be available. Check back with GoodRx to find more ways to save and make your vaccinations more affordable.

Who Should Not Get These Vaccines

Pneumococcal Vaccination Complete Guidelines *USMLE STEPs 1, 2 & 3*

Because of age or health conditions, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines below specific to pneumococcal vaccines and ask your or your childs doctor for more information.

Children younger than 2 years old should not get PPSV23. In addition, tell the person who is giving you or your child a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine if:

You or your child have had a life-threatening allergic reaction or have a severe allergy.

  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any of the following should not get PCV13:
  • A shot of this vaccine
  • An earlier pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7
  • Any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid
  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PPSV23 should not get another shot.
  • Anyone with a severe allergy to any part of either of these vaccines should not get that vaccine. Your or your childs doctor can tell you about the vaccines ingredients.
  • You or your child are not feeling well.

    • People who have a mild illness, such as a cold, can probably get vaccinated. People who have a more serious illness should probably wait until they recover. Your or your childs doctor can advise you.

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    How Does It Work

    Prevnar 20 is a conjugate vaccine. This means that it contains pieces of sugar-like substances called polysaccharides that typically coat the bacteria but also hide it from our immune system. The vaccine uses only a certain portion of the bacteria not the bacteria itself so its unable to cause an infection.

    This conjugate vaccine uses 20 slightly different polysaccharides that are specific to the 20 serotypes and attaches them to proteins that our immune systems can recognize. If the bacteria enters the body after the vaccination is administered, the immune system can recognize the polysaccharide molecule and release antibodies to fight the bacteria before it causes an infection.

    Who Should Get Pneumococcal Vaccines

    CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger than 2 years old and all adults 65 years or older. In certain situations, older children and other adults should also get pneumococcal vaccines. Below is more information about who should and should not get each type of pneumococcal vaccine.

    Talk to your or your childs doctor about what is best for your specific situation.

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    Vi Surveillance And Research Priorities

    • Determine whether the concomitant administration of PNEU-C-13 and PNEU-P-23 increases the risk of immune interference or the risk of adverse events.
    • Conduct research on the efficacy and effectiveness of PNEU-C-13 boosters in immunocompetent adults over 65 years of age.
    • Collect and analyze national serotype-specific and age-specific data for IPD and CAP

    Children At High Risk Of Ipd

    Prevenar 13 Dosage &  Drug Information

    Infants at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition should receive Pneu-C-13 vaccine in a 4 dose schedule at 2 months, 4 months and 6 months followed by a dose at 12 to 15 months of age. Table 3 summarizes the recommended schedules for Pneu-C-13 vaccine for infants and children at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition by pneumococcal conjugate vaccination history.

    In addition to Pneu-C-13 vaccine, children at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition should receive 1 dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine at 24 months of age, at least 8 weeks after Pneu-C-13 vaccine. If an older child or adolescent at high risk of IPD due to an underlying medical condition has not previously received Pneu-P-23 vaccine, 1 dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine should be administered, at least 8 weeks after Pneu-C-13 vaccine. Children and adolescents at highest risk of IPD should receive 1 booster dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine refer to Booster doses and re-immunization. Refer to Immunocompromised persons for information about immunization of HSCT recipients.

    Table 3: Recommended Schedules for Pneu-C-13 Vaccine for Children 2 months to less than 18 years of age, by Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination History

    Age at presentation for immunizationNumber of doses of Pneu-C-7, Pneu-C-10 or Pneu-C-13 previously received

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    Does Pneumovax 23 Cause Side Effects

    Pneumovax 23 is an immunization used to prevent pneumonia. This pneumococcal vaccine contains chemicals extracted from 23 types of Streptococcuspneumonia bacteria.

    Upon injecting pneumococcal vaccine, the body recognizes these chemical as foreign and produces antibodies to destroy the chemicals. Antibodies are blood protein that help the body fight infection and destroy other harmful substances.

    Once produced, these antibodies destroy injected Streptococcuspneumonia chemicals but the antibodies remain active in the body and can detect the same chemicals from live Streptococcus pneumonia in the future. If a vaccinated person comes in contact with Streptococcus pneumonia the antibodies will destroy the bacteria and prevent pneumonia or reduce its severity.

    Pneumovax 23 should not be confused with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine used in special conditions because often in the medical literature the non-specific term “pneumococcal vaccine” is used.

    Common side effects of Pneumovax 23 include

    Serious side effects of Pneumovax 23 include severe allergic reactions.

    Drug interactions of Pneumovax 23 include zoster vaccine live administered at the same time. When they are given concurrently, Pneumovax 23 reduces the response of zoster vaccine compared to those who received both vaccines 4 weeks apart.

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