Monday, October 3, 2022

Pneumonia Shot Side Effects Prevnar 13

What Is The Pneumonia Vaccine

Pneumococcal (PCV) Vaccine for Babies – Schedule, Side Effects & more

The pneumonia vaccine is an injection that prevents you from contracting pneumococcal disease. There are two pneumococcal vaccines licensed by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States:

  • PCV13 Prevnar 13®: This vaccine helps protect against the 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly cause serious infections in children and adults. Doctors give this vaccine to children at 12 through 15 months, 2, 4, and 6 years old. Adults who need this vaccine get just one shot.
  • PPSV23 Pneumovax23®: This vaccine helps protect against serious infections caused by 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria. Doctors give a single shot of this vaccine to people who need it, but the CDC recommends one or two additional shots for people with certain chronic medical conditions.
  • The Center for Disease Control recommends the PCV13 vaccine for:

    • All children younger than 2 years old
    • People 2 years or older with certain medical conditions

    The CDC recommends PPSV23 for:

    • All adults 65 years or older
    • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions
    • Smokers 19 through 64 years old

    Doses To Help Protect

    To help you stay on track, keep in mind that each dose has to be given 4-8 weeks apart and that the 4th dose canât be given sooner than 2 months after the 3rd.

    Here are the 4 most common ways the PREVNAR 13® vaccine appears on your babyâs vaccination record:

    • PCV13
    • Pneumococcal

    To help you stay on track, keep in mind that each dose has to be given 4-8 weeks apart and that the 4th dose canât be given sooner than 2 months after the 3rd.

    Getting every recommended dose of PREVNAR 13® on time provides your baby with the optimal protection. Stick to the CDC-recommended dosing schedule â vaccinate your baby at 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months of age â to ensure your babyâs defense against invasive pneumococcal disease is the strongest it can be.

    PREVNAR 13® is recommended by doctors at the American Academy of Pediatrics , and by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices .

    PREVNAR 13® is recommended by doctors at the American Academy of Pediatrics , and by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices .

    Side Effects Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Like most vaccines, the childhood and adult versions of the pneumococcal vaccine can sometimes cause mild side effects.

    These include:

    • redness where the injection was given
    • hardness or swelling where the injection was given

    There are no serious side effects listed for either the childhood or adult versions of the vaccine, apart from an extremely rare risk of a severe allergic reaction .

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    What Should I Discuss With My Healthcare Provider Before Receiving This Vaccine

    Keep track of any and all side effects your child has after receiving this vaccine. When the child receives a booster dose, you will need to tell the doctor if the previous shot caused any side effects.

    You should not receive this vaccine if you ever had a severe allergic reaction to a pneumococcal or diphtheria vaccine.

    Before your child receives this vaccine, tell your doctor if the child was born prematurely.

    To make sure you or your child can safely receive this vaccine, tell your doctor if you or your child have any of these other conditions:

    • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder such as hemophilia or easy bruising or
    • a weak immune system caused by disease, bone marrow transplant, or by using certain medicines or receiving cancer treatments.

    You can still receive a vaccine if you have a minor cold. In the case of a more severe illness with a fever or any type of infection, wait until you get better before receiving this vaccine.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Pneumonia

    Pneumococcal Vaccine

    The signs and symptoms of pneumonia can range from mild to severe. The symptoms depend on the type of germ that caused the infection, your age and overall health. Mild signs and symptoms of pneumonia are often similar the symptoms of a cold or flu, but the effects of pneumonia last longer.

    Signs and symptoms of pneumonia may include:

    • Chest pain when you breathe or cough
    • Confusion or changes in mental awareness
    • Cough, which may produce phlegm
    • Fatigue
    • Fever, sweating and shaking chills
    • Lower-than-normal body temperature
    • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
    • Shortness of breath

    Newborns and infants may not show any sign or symptoms of the infection. However, they may vomit, have a fever, cough, be restless or tired, or have difficulty breathing and eating.

    Read Also: Best Way To Treat Pneumonia In Elderly

    What Are Common Side Effects Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    The most common side effects of Pneumovax23 are injection-site pain or soreness , swelling or lump , headache , weakness and fatigue , muscle aches , and fever .

    For Prevnar13, the most common side effects depended on the age of the patient:

    • Infants and toddlers vaccinated at 2, 4, 6, and 12-15 months of age: Irritability , injection site tenderness , decreased appetite , decreased sleep , increased sleep , fever , injection site redness , and injection site swelling .
    • Children aged 5 through 17 years: Injection site tenderness , injection site redness , injection site swelling , irritability , decreased appetite , increased sleep , fever , and decreased sleep .
    • Adults aged 18 years and older: Pain at the injection site , fatigue , headache , muscle pain , joint pain , decreased appetite , injection site redness , injection site swelling , limitation of arm movement , vomiting , fever , chills , and rash .

    Dont Smoke Or Abuse Alcohol

    As previously mentioned, the chemicals in cigarettes can compromise the immune system, lowering its ability to defend itself from the organisms that make you sick.

    Chronic alcohol use increases your risk of hospitalization and damages alveolar macrophages and phagocytic cells that ingest and clear inhaled microbes as the first line of defense in lung cellular immunity.

    Chronic alcohol exposure significantly interferes with alveolar macrophage function, making your lungs more vulnerable to infections that they could otherwise defend themselves against.

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    What To Do If Your Child Is Unwell After The Vaccine

    Its possible that your child may feel unwell after receiving a dose of the pneumococcal vaccine. Should this happen, there are ways to help ease their symptoms.

    If your child has a fever, try to keep them cool. You can do this by providing cool liquids for them to drink and ensuring theyre not wearing too many layers.

    Tenderness, redness or discoloration, and swelling at the site of the shot can be eased by applying a cool compress. To do this, wet a clean washcloth with cool water and place it gently on the affected area.

    Symptoms like fever and pain at the site of the shot may be alleviated using over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen . Be sure to use the infant formulation and to carefully follow the dosing instructions on the product packaging.

    Prior to being approved for use, the safety and effectiveness of all vaccines must be rigorously evaluated in clinical trials. Lets take a look at some of the research into the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccines.

    A evaluated the effectiveness of the PCV13 vaccine in children. It found that:

    • The vaccine effectiveness of PCV13 against the 13 pneumococcal strains included in the vaccine was 86 percent.
    • The vaccine effectiveness against pneumococcal disease due to any strain of S.pneumoniae was 60.2 percent.
    • The effectiveness of PCV13 didnt differ significantly between children with and without underlying health conditions.

    The CDC also notes that more than

    You shouldnt get the PCV13 vaccine if youre:

    What If You Never Got Prevnar 13 As A Child

    PCV13 for Immunocompromised Adults

    Lets say you never got a vaccine for pneumococcal bacteria when you were little . Most of you will just wait until you turn 65 years old, at which time, youll get Prevnar 13 followed by Pneumovax 23 at least 1 year later.

    In certain cases, the timing may be different. Your provider will be able to advise you based on your specific situation.

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    Prevnar 13 Vs Pneumovax 2: Differences Similarities And Which Is Better For You

    Drug overview & main differences | Conditions treated | Efficacy | Insurance coverage and cost comparison | Side effects | Drug interactions | Warnings | FAQ

    Pneumonia is an infection of one or both lung, which can be life-threatening, especially in infants and children, patients who are immunocompromised, and adults over 65. According to the CDC, about 50,000 people die in the US every year from pneumonia. Prevnar 13 and Pneumovax 23 are two brand-name vaccines approved by the FDA. Both vaccines are used to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and its complications, but they have some differences such as how they are administered, and the types of bacteria they protect against. Lets compare the two below.

    Pneumonia Vaccine Side Effects

    Prevnar vaccineside effects consist of redness, swelling and pain or tenderness at the injection site, fever, loss of appetite, fussiness or irritability, fatigue, headache, and in some cases a serious allergic reaction. Pneumovax side effects consist of redness and pain at the site of injection, fever, and muscle aches, similar to that of the influenza vaccine.

    Recently, My Vaccine Lawyer’s founding partner Max Muller was interviewed by NBC Philadelphia about Pneumonia shot injuries from vaccines along with the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, a federal compensation program forvaccine injuries in the United States.

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    What Is Pneumococcal 13

    Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain, and these conditions can be fatal.

    Pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by pneumococcal bacteria. This vaccine contains 13 different types of pneumococcal bacteria.

    Pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine works by exposing you to a small amount of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. This vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

    Pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine is for use in children from 6 weeks to 5 years old, and in adults who are 50 and older.

    Becoming infected with pneumococcal disease is much more dangerous to your health than receiving this vaccine. However, like any medicine, this vaccine can cause side effects but the risk of serious side effects is extremely low.

    Like any vaccine, pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine may not provide protection from disease in every person.

    Pneumonia Vaccine Injury Compensation

    Pneumococcal Vaccine Guide

    If you or a loved one has suffered an adverse reaction, illness, severe or mild side effects, and/or a shoulder injury after receiving the pneumonia vaccine, you may qualify for compensation from a federal program called the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. Call the national vaccine injury attorneys at My Vaccine Lawyer for more information. Not only is the phone call free, but our representation comes at no cost to you.

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    Conditions Treated By Prevnar 13 And Pneumovax 23

    Prevnar 13 is indicated for:

    Children six weeks through five years old :

    • Active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F and 23F
    • Active immunization to prevent otitis media caused by S. pneumoniae serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F

    Children 6 to 17 years old :

    • Active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by S. pneumoniae serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F and 23F

    Adults 18 years and older:

    • Active immunization to prevent pneumonia and invasive disease caused by S. pneumoniae serotypes 1, 3, 4, 5, 6A, 6B, 7F, 9V, 14, 18C, 19A, 19F and 23F

    Pneumovax 23 is indicated for active immunization for the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease that is caused by the 23 serotypes contained in the vaccine . It is approved for use in patients ages 50 years or older, and patients 2 years old who are at increased risk for pneumococcal disease.

    Acip Guidelines Aged 6

    Any of the following conditions:

    Cerebrospinal fluid leak

    Sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies

    Anatomic or functional asplenia

    Chronic renal failure

    Nephrotic syndrome

    Diseases associated with immunosuppressive drugs or radiation therapy, including malignant neoplasms, leukemias, lymphomas, and Hodgkin disease generalized malignancy solid organ transplantation or multiple myeloma

    1. If neither PCV13 nor PPSV23 has been received previously, administer 1 dose of PCV13 now and 1 dose of PPSV23 at least 8 wk later

    2. If PCV13 has been received previously but PPSV23 has not, administer 1 dose of PPSV23 at least 8 wk after the most recent dose of PCV13

    3. If PPSV23 has been received but PCV13 has not, administer 1 dose of PCV13 at least 8 wk after the most recent dose of PPSV23

    Heart, lung, diabetes, liver diseases in 6-17 year olds

    • Any of the following conditions:
    • Chronic heart disease
    • Chronic lung disease
    • Diabetes mellitus
    • Chronic liver disease
    • If the patient has not received PPSV23, administer 1 dose of PPSV23
    • If PCV13 has been received previously, then PPSV23 should be administered at least 8 wk after any prior PCV13 dose

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    Pharmacist Tips For Prevnar 13

    Ask your provider if Prevnar 13 is right for you before you receive this vaccine because it might not be appropriate for everyone.

    Prevnar 13 is injected into the muscle, typically in the shoulder of toddlers, children, and adults. Infants are usually given the injection in the thigh.

    Wait until you are healthy to get the Prevnar 13. This will help make sure your immune system protects you as best as it can. If you have a mild sickness, such as a cold, you can still get Prevnar 13. But if you feel moderately to severely sick, wait until you recover before getting this vaccine.

    Make sure to keep a record of all your immmunizations and show it to your provider or pharmacist before receiving any vaccine, including Prevnar 13. This is helpful for your provider or pharmacist in figuring out what vaccines you need.

    Read the vaccine information statement for more information on Prevnar 13.

    If you develop a severe reaction to Prevnar 13, you or your provider can report it to the vaccine adverse event reporting system website or by calling 1-800-822-7967.

    Prices for Prevnar 13 start at just $217.00 with a GoodRx coupon. Theyâre fast, easy-to-use and free!

    Drug Interactions Of Prevnar 13 Vs Pneumovax 23

    There’s a new pneumonia vaccine for adults

    In children and adolescents, there is not enough data to know if Prevnar 13 can be given at the same time as Human Papillomavirus Vaccine , Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine, Adsorbed .

    In adults, no data is available on the administration of Prevnar 13 together with diphtheria toxoid-containing vaccines and other vaccines used in adults 50 years and older.

    When Prevnar 13 is administered at the same time as another injectable vaccine, the vaccines should be administered with different syringes and injected at different sites. Prevnar 13 should not be mixed with other vaccines in the same syringe.

    Giving Tylenol before Prevnar 13 may reduce the bodys response to the vaccine. Patients who are immunocompromised due to immunosuppressive therapy may not respond optimally to the vaccine.

    Patients receiving the shingles vaccine, Zostavax, may have a lower immune response when receiving the vaccine at the same time as Pneumovax 23. The two vaccines should be separated by at least 4 weeks. This should rarely be an issue, though, as Shingrix is now the preferred shingles vaccine. There is limited data regarding other vaccines given at the same time as Pneumovax 23. Consult your healthcare provider for guidance.

    Other interactions may occur. Consult your healthcare provider about the possibility of drug or vaccine interactions with Prevnar 13 or Pneumovax 23.

    Drug

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    Concurrent Administration Of Vaccines

    Pneumococcal vaccines may be administered concomitantly with other vaccines, with the exception of a different formulation of pneumococcal vaccine . There should be at least an 8 week interval between a dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and a subsequent dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine, and at least a 1 year interval between a dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine and a subsequent dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine refer to Immunocompromised persons for information regarding administration of pneumococcal vaccines to HSCT recipients. Different injection sites and separate needles and syringes must be used for concurrent parenteral injections. Refer to Timing of Vaccine Administration in Part 1 for additional information about concurrent administration of vaccines.

    Acip Guidelines Aged 2

    Any of the following conditions:

    Chronic heart disease

    Chronic lung disease

    Diabetes mellitus

    Sickle cell disease and other hemoglobinopathies

    Anatomic or functional asplenia

    Chronic renal failure

    Nephrotic syndrome

    Diseases associated with immunosuppressive drugs or radiation therapy, including malignant neoplasms, leukemias, lymphomas, and Hodgkin disease solid organ transplantation or congenital immunodeficiency

    Dosage for high risk 2-5 years olds

    • 1. Administer 1 dose of PCV13 if 3 doses of PCV were received previously
    • 2. Administer 2 doses of PCV at least 8 weeks apart if fewer than 3 doses of PCV13 were received previously
    • 3. Administer 1 supplemental dose of PCV13 if 4 doses of PCV7 or other age-appropriate complete PCV7 series was received previously
    • 4. The minimum interval between doses of PCV is 8 wk
    • 5. For children with no history of PPSV23 vaccination, administer PPSV23 at least 8 wk after the most recent dose of PCV13

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    About The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Pneumonia is a common enough illness, but its one that can have potentially devastating reactions. Fortunately, theres a way to prevent the serious side effects of the disease, and possibly prevent someone from getting it to begin with.

    The pneumonia vaccine is a safe way to prevent most cases, and effectively lowers the chances of catching the disease entirely. People who do get pneumonia after getting the pneumonia vaccination anyway will have a much milder case of the disease if they do happen to contract it.

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