Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Pneumonia Vaccine At What Age

Who Should Not Get These Vaccines

Pneumonia Vaccination

Because of age or health conditions, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines below specific to pneumococcal vaccines and ask your or your childs doctor for more information.

Children younger than 2 years old should not get PPSV23. In addition, tell the person who is giving you or your child a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine if:

You or your child have had a life-threatening allergic reaction or have a severe allergy.

  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any of the following should not get PCV13:
  • A shot of this vaccine
  • An earlier pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7
  • Any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid
  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PPSV23 should not get another shot.
  • Anyone with a severe allergy to any part of either of these vaccines should not get that vaccine. Your or your childs doctor can tell you about the vaccines ingredients.
  • You or your child are not feeling well.

    • People who have a mild illness, such as a cold, can probably get vaccinated. People who have a more serious illness should probably wait until they recover. Your or your childs doctor can advise you.

    Who Should Get The Vaccine

    Pneumococcal vaccine should be given to anyone 65 years of age and older, as well as adults and children two years and older who have the following high-risk medical conditions :

    • chronic heart, kidney or lung disease
    • nephrotic syndrome
    • chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis of the liver
    • alcoholism
    • chronic cerebral spinal fluid leak
    • HIV
    • other diseases or therapy that suppress the immune system
    • no spleen or a spleen that does not work properly
    • sickle cell disease
    • solid organ or islet cell transplant
    • cochlear implants
    • Immunosuppression related to disease or therapy

    Pneumonia Mortality Rates By Age

    The chart shows the annual number of deaths from pneumonia per 100,000 people in different age groups.

    Looking at the age-group of under 5 year olds we see that there has been a 3-fold reduction in child mortality due to pneumonia over the last three decades. 363 children out of every 100,000 died due to pneumonia in 1990, until 2017 that number has fallen to 119.

    The mortality rates among other age groups have remained largely the same. The highest pneumonia mortality rates in 2017 were among people aged 70 and older. 261 out of 100,000 people died in this age group due to pneumonia. Thats a 9% decrease in mortality rates over the past 3 decades.4

    Also Check: Can You Drink Alcohol After Pneumonia Shot

    What If It Is Not Clear What A Person’s Vaccination History Is

    When indicated, vaccines should be administered to patients with unknown vaccination status. All residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should have their vaccination status assessed and documented.

    How long must a person wait to receive other vaccinations?

    Inactivated influenza vaccine and tetanusvaccines may be given at the same time as or at any time before or after a dose of pneumococcus vaccine. There are no requirements to wait between the doses of these or any other inactivated vaccines.

    Vaccination of children recommended

    In July 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC jointly recommended childhood pneumococcal immunization, since pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States.

    “The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV13 or Prevnar 13, is currently recommended for all children younger than 5 years of age, all adults 65 years or older, and persons 6 through 64 years of age with certain medical conditions,” according to the 2014 AAP/CDC guidelines. “Pneumovax is a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that is currently recommended for use in all adults 65 years of age or older and for persons who are 2 years and older and at high risk for pneumococcal disease . PPSV23 is also recommended for use in adults 19 through 64 years of age who smoke cigarettes or who have asthma.”

    Take Steps To Help Your Body Recover

    PneumoRecs VaxAdvisor

    The following steps can help your body recover from pneumonia.

    • Choose heart-healthy foods, because good nutrition helps your body recover.
    • Drink plenty of fluids to help you stay hydrated.
    • Dont drink alcohol or use illegal drugs. Alcohol and illegal drugs weaken your immune system and can raise the risk of complications from pneumonia.
    • Dont smoke and avoid secondhand smoke. Breathing in smoke can worsen your pneumonia. Visit Smoking and Your Heart and Your Guide to a Healthy Heart. For free help quitting smoking, you may call the National Cancer Institutes Smoking Quitline at 1-877-44U-QUIT .
    • Get plenty of sleep. Good quality sleep can help your body rest and improve the response of your immune system. For more information on sleep, visit our How Sleep Works health topic.
    • Get light physical activity. Moving around can help you regain your strength and improve your recovery. However, you may still feel short of breath, and activity that is too strenuous may make you dizzy. Talk to your doctor about how much activity is right for you.
    • Sit upright to help you feel more comfortable and breathe more easily.
    • Take a couple of deep breaths several times a day.

    Read Also: Do You Need A Pneumonia Vaccine Every Year

    What You Should Know About Pneumonia

    Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs that typically stems from several kinds of germs, most often bacteria and viruses.

    Symptoms can develop gradually or suddenly. They include:

    • Fever.
    • Chest pain.
    • Loss of appetite.

    Early detection is often challenging because many people with these symptoms assume they have a cold or the flu.

    Its important to also note that the vaccine helps protect against some but not all bacterial pneumonia.

    There are dozens of different types of bacterial pneumonia, says Dr. Suri. The vaccine will certainly reduce your risk of the most common bacterial pneumonia.

    Concerns About Immunisation Side Effects

    If the side effect following immunisation is unexpected, persistent or severe or if you are worried about yourself or your childs condition after a vaccination, see your doctor or immunisation nurse as soon as possible or go directly to a hospital. Immunisation side effects may be reported to SAEFVIC, the Victorian vaccine safety service.

    It is also important to seek medical advice if you are unwell, as this may be due to other illness rather than because of the vaccination.

    You May Like: Signs That You May Have Pneumonia

    How Much Do Pneumovax 23 And Prevnar 13 Cost

    Pneumovax 23 and Prevnar 13 can be quite expensive without insurance. One dose of Pneumovax 23 currently costs around $135 cash price, while one dose of Prevnar 13 costs around $250 cash price. With a GoodRx coupon, you might be able to reduce your cost for these to around $90 and $195, respectively. Read here for information on how to use a GoodRx coupon for vaccines.

    All health insurance marketplace plans under the Affordable Care Act, and most other private insurance plans, must cover pneumococcal vaccines without charging a copayment or coinsurance when an in-network provider administers the vaccine even if you have not met a yearly deductible. Medicare does not cover either vaccine.

    Remember: The recommendations for who should get a pneumonia vaccination are based on risk factors and age, so be sure to talk to your doctor if you think you might need one. You should be able to receive both Pneumovax 23 and Prevnar 13 at your local pharmacy. Depending on which state you live in, these vaccines may not require a prescription. Be sure to reach out to your pharmacist for more information. The CDC has more information about these vaccinations here.

    Babies And The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Understanding Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Babies are routinely vaccinated with a type of pneumococcal vaccine known as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as part of their childhood vaccination programme.

    Babies born on or after 1 January 2020 have 2 injections, which are usually given at:

    • 12 weeks old
    • 1 year old

    Babies born before this date will continue to be offered 3 doses, at 8 and 16 weeks and a booster at 1 year.

    Also Check: How To Check For Pneumonia

    Persons With Inadequate Immunization Records

    Children and adults lacking adequate documentation of immunization should be considered unimmunized and should be started on an immunization schedule appropriate for their age and risk factors. Pneumococcal vaccines may be given, regardless of possible previous receipt of the vaccines, as adverse events associated with repeated immunization have not been demonstrated. Refer to Immunization of Persons with Inadequate Immunization Records in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of people with inadequate immunization records.

    Who Should Get Pneumococcal Vaccines

    CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger than 2 years old and all adults 65 years or older. In certain situations, older children and other adults should also get pneumococcal vaccines. Below is more information about who should and should not get each type of pneumococcal vaccine.

    Talk to your or your childs doctor about what is best for your specific situation.

    Recommended Reading: What Can You Take To Help With Pneumonia

    How Do You Catch Pneumococcus

    Pneumococcus is a bacterium that is commonly found lining the surface of the nose and the back of the throat in fact, about 25 of every 100 people are colonized with pneumococcus. Many children will come in contact with pneumococcus sometime in the first two years of life. Because most adults have immunity to pneumococcus, a mother will passively transfer antibodies from her own blood to the blood of her baby before the baby is born. The antibodies that the baby gets before birth usually last for a few months. However, as these maternal antibody levels diminish, the baby becomes vulnerable. Most children who first come in contact with pneumococcus don’t have a problem. But every year tens of thousands of children suffer severe, often debilitating, and occasionally fatal infections with pneumococcus most of these children were previously healthy and well nourished.

    What Is A Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Senior citizens to get free anti

    A pneumococcal vaccine is an injection that can prevent pneumococcal disease. A pneumococcal disease is any illness that is caused by pneumococcal bacteria, including pneumonia. In fact, the most common cause of pneumonia is pneumococcal bacteria. This type of bacteria can also cause ear infections, sinus infections, and meningitis.

    Adults age 65 or older are amongst the highest risk groups for getting pneumococcal disease.

    To prevent pneumococcal disease, there are two types of pneumococcal vaccines: the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine .

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    Who Should Not Have The Vaccine

    The pneumococcal vaccine used between 1978 and 1983 protected against only 14 types of the pneumococcus. People who received this vaccine do not usually need to get another shot.

    • If you think you have already been vaccinated for pneumococcal disease, let your doctor know.
    • The polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine is not recommended for children under two years of age.
    • You should not have the vaccine if you have a severe allergy to any component of the vaccine.

    The Above Policy Is Based On The Following References:

  • Adawi M, Bragazzi NL, McGonagle D, et al. Immunogenicity, safety and tolerability of anti-pneumococcal vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: An evidence-informed and PRISMA compliant systematic review and meta-analysis. Autoimmun Rev. 2019 18:73-92.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Infectious Diseases. 1997 Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 24th ed. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics 1997.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Infectious Diseases. Policy statement: Recommendations for the prevention of pneumococcal infections, including the use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine , pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and antibiotic prophylaxis. Pediatrics. 2000 106:362-366.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Infectious Diseases. Technical report: Prevention of pneumococcal infections, including use of pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotic prophylaxis. Pediatrics. 2000 106:367-376.
  • American College of Physicians Task Force on Adult Immunization and Infectious Disease Society of America. Guide for Adult Immunization. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: American College of Physicians 1994.
  • Anderson HH. Pneumococcal vaccination in elderly and at-risk patients. Am Fam Physician. 1998 57:2346.
  • Berman-Rosa M, O’Donnell S, Barker M, Quach C. Efficacy and effectiveness of the PCV-10 and PCV-13 vaccines against invasive pneumococcal disease. Pediatrics. 2020 145:e20190377.
  • Recommended Reading: Are Pneumonia Shots Given Annually

    Prevention Of Acute Exacerbations Of Copd In Persons With Moderate Severe Or Very Severe Copd

    The American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society guideline on “Prevention of acute exacerbations of COPD” states that in patients with COPD, the panel suggests administering the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine as part of overall medical management but did not find sufficient evidence that pneumococcal vaccination prevents acute exacerbations of COPD .

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    How The Pneumococcal Vaccine Works

    There’s a new pneumonia vaccine for adults

    Both types of pneumococcal vaccine encourage your body to produce antibodies against pneumococcal bacteria.

    Antibodies are proteins produced by the body to neutralise or destroy disease-carrying organisms and toxins.

    They protect you from becoming ill if you’re infected with the bacteria.

    More than 90 different strains of the pneumococcal bacterium have been identified, although most of these strains do not cause serious infections.

    The childhood vaccine protects against 13 strains of the pneumococcal bacterium, while the adult vaccine protects against 23 strains.

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    What Are The Side Effects Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    After receiving the pneumococcal vaccine, children commonly will have pain or swelling where the shot is given and occasionally low-grade fever. About 1 of every 100 children will develop a high fever.

    Side effects from the polysaccharide version used in adults include tenderness and redness at the injection site, and about 1 of every 100 people will get a fever and experience muscle aches.

    Pneumonia Risk Factors For People Aged 70 And Older

    The risk factors for developing pneumonia in people aged 70 and older are similar to the risk factors that lead to pneumonia in children.

    Outdoor air pollution small particulate matter air pollution is the risk factor that lead to most deaths. In 2017 it lead to more than 300,000 deaths from pneumonia of older people.

    Smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke have contributed to 150,000 and 73,000 deaths from pneumonia in this age group, respectively.

    Recommended Reading: Can You Get Pneumonia From Air Conditioning

    When Will My Child Be Vaccinated

    The pneumococcal vaccine’s given to babies at 12 weeks of age with a booster dose given between 12 and 13 months. The vaccine can be given at any time and one injection provides years of protection.

    The pneumococcal booster dose between 12 and 13 months is usually given at the same time as the Hib/MenC, MMR and MenB vaccines.

    Pregnancy And Pneumococcal Immunisation

    Vaccinations are just as important for adults as for kids ...

    Immunisation against pneumococcal disease is not usually recommended for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Women who are at increased risk of pneumococcal infection should be vaccinated before pregnancy or as soon as possible after giving birth. Speak with your doctor about whether you are at risk of infection and should be immunised.

    Recommended Reading: Do You Get A Cough With Pneumonia

    Do The Pneumonia Vaccines Work

    The pneumococcal vaccines are very effective at preventing pneumonia and other pneumococcal diseases in both adults and children. In one large study of over 84,000 adults aged 65 and older, those who received PCV13 were less likely to get pneumococcal pneumonia than were those who received a placebo shot. The vaccine protected about 45% of vaccinated people from getting pneumonia and about 75% from getting an invasive pneumococcal disease. Invasive pneumococcal disease is the most serious type and can be life-threatening.

    PPSV23 is also effective and protects at least 50% of vaccinated, healthy adults from invasive pneumococcal infections.

    In children, PCV13 has decreased the amount of invasive pneumococcal disease. According to the CDC, PCV13 prevented about 30,000 cases of invasive disease in the first 3 years it was available.

    Getting the vaccine not only protects you from getting pneumonia and other types of pneumococcal disease, but also protects vulnerable people around you who cant get vaccinated.

    What To Do If Your Child Is Unwell After The Vaccine

    Its possible that your child may feel unwell after receiving a dose of the pneumococcal vaccine. Should this happen, there are ways to help ease their symptoms.

    If your child has a fever, try to keep them cool. You can do this by providing cool liquids for them to drink and ensuring theyre not wearing too many layers.

    Tenderness, redness or discoloration, and swelling at the site of the shot can be eased by applying a cool compress. To do this, wet a clean washcloth with cool water and place it gently on the affected area.

    Symptoms like fever and pain at the site of the shot may be alleviated using over-the-counter medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen . Be sure to use the infant formulation and to carefully follow the dosing instructions on the product packaging.

    Prior to being approved for use, the safety and effectiveness of all vaccines must be rigorously evaluated in clinical trials. Lets take a look at some of the research into the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccines.

    A evaluated the effectiveness of the PCV13 vaccine in children. It found that:

    • The vaccine effectiveness of PCV13 against the 13 pneumococcal strains included in the vaccine was 86 percent.
    • The vaccine effectiveness against pneumococcal disease due to any strain of S.pneumoniae was 60.2 percent.
    • The effectiveness of PCV13 didnt differ significantly between children with and without underlying health conditions.

    The CDC also notes that more than

    You shouldnt get the PCV13 vaccine if youre:

    Read Also: Does Medicare Cover The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Immunization : Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    Vaccines or needles are the best way to protect against some very serious infections. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization strongly recommends routine immunization.

    This vaccine protects adults and children two years of age and older against pneumococcal infections like pneumonia. This type of vaccine is only effective in people two years of age and older, and should not be given to children under two years of age. A different type of pneumococcal vaccine is effective in children under two years of age. This fact sheet refers to the “polysaccharide” vaccine only.

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