Saturday, October 1, 2022

What Age Can You Get Pneumonia Vaccine

Persons With Chronic Diseases

Pneumonia Can Be PreventedVaccines Can Help Older Adults

Refer to Immunization of Persons with Chronic Diseases in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of people with chronic diseases.

Asplenia or hyposplenia

Hyposplenic or asplenic individuals should receive Pneu-C-13 vaccine and Pneu-P-23 vaccine, followed by a booster dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Refer to Table 3, Table 4 and Booster doses and re-immunization for additional information.

Chronic kidney disease and patients on dialysis

Individuals with chronic kidney disease should receive age appropriate pneumococcal vaccines. Children less than 18 years of age with chronic kidney failure or nephrotic syndrome, should receive Pneu-C-13 vaccine and Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Adults with chronic kidney failure should receive Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Adults with nephrotic syndrome should receive Pneu-C-13 and Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Due to the decreased immunogenicity and efficacy of Pneu-P-23 vaccine in children and adults with chronic kidney failure, 1 booster dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine is recommended. Refer to Table 3, Table 4 and Booster doses and re-immunization for additional information.

Neurologic disorders

Chronic lung disease, including asthma

Chronic heart disease

Chronic liver disease

Endocrine and metabolic diseases

Non-malignant hematologic disorders

Cochlear implants

Tdap Vaccine And/or The Td Booster

Who needs it: The Tdap vaccine came out in 2005, and along with protecting against tetanus and diphtheria, like the vaccine it replaced, it also includes new, additional protection against whooping cough, also known as pertussis. If you cant remember ever getting this shot, you probably need it. And doing so, says Katz, can also count for one of the Td boosters youre supposed to get every 10 years.

How often: You get Tdap only once, and after that, you still need the Td booster every 10 years. Otherwise, your protection against tetanus and diphtheria will fade.

Why you need it: Due to a rise in whooping cough cases in the U.S., you really do need to be vaccinated against it, even if youre over 65. In the first year after getting vaccinated, Tdap prevents the illness in about 7 out of 10 people who received the vaccine.

Talk to your doctor if you: Have epilepsy or other nervous system problems, had severe swelling or pain after a previous dose of either vaccine, or have Guillain-Barré syndrome.

Parting shot: This vaccine is especially crucial for people who have close contact with infants younger than 12 months of age including parents, grandparents, and child care providers.

People With Health Problems And The Pneumococcal Vaccine

The PPV vaccine is available on the NHS for children and adults aged from 2 to 64 years old who are at a higher risk of developing a pneumococcal infection than the general population.

This is generally the same people who are eligible for annual flu vaccination.

You’re considered to be at a higher risk of a pneumococcal infection if you have:

Adults and children who are severely immunocompromised usually have a single dose of PCV followed by PPV.

Also Check: Antibiotics Used To Treat Pneumonia

Know The Facts About The Pneumonia Vaccine

Just as with a flu shot, and now the COVID-19 vaccines, some people believe that getting a pneumococcal vaccine will cause them to come down with the disease or experience long-term side effects.

This is absolutely not true, Dr. Suri says.

Not only will the pneumococcal vaccine help reduce the risk of contracting certain types of bacterial pneumonia, it also guards against serious consequences resulting from the flu and severe infections, such as .

For young children, older adults, smokers and those with other risk factors, the vaccine is a healthy choice to make.

I cant see any reason to avoid this vaccine and every reason to get it, she says.

About The Pneumonia Vaccine

Seasonal Flu (Influenza)

Pneumonia is a common enough illness, but its one that can have potentially devastating reactions. Fortunately, theres a way to prevent the serious side effects of the disease, and possibly prevent someone from getting it to begin with.

The pneumonia vaccine is a safe way to prevent most cases, and effectively lowers the chances of catching the disease entirely. People who do get pneumonia after getting the pneumonia vaccination anyway will have a much milder case of the disease if they do happen to contract it.

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Immunisation Against Pneumococcal Disease For Babies And Children

The immunisation schedule for babies involves a course of a primary vaccine that reduces the risk of infection with 13 strains of pneumococcal bacteria.

A second type of vaccine that reduces the risk of infection with 23 strains of pneumococcal bacteria is given as a booster dose to children from four years of age if they:

  • have a medical condition putting them at high risk of pneumococcal disease, or
  • were born prematurely before 28 weeks gestation.

Protection for babies and children against pneumococcal disease is available under the National Immunisation Program Schedule. In Victoria, immunisation against pneumococcal disease is free of charge for:

Your Good Health: You Can Get Pneumonia Even When Vaccinated

    Dear Dr. Roach: When I was 55, my doctor recommended that I have the pneumonia vaccination, and a booster a couple of years ago. I am 72 now. Is it likely Hillary Clinton would have got one? Can you get pneumonia after having the vaccination? If so, why would it be recommended, and are they harmful?

    S.M.

    I dont know whether Mrs. Clinton was vaccinated. However, expert groups recommend vaccination. The current recommendation from the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is to get the PCV13 at age 65, followed by a dose of PPSV23 six to 12 months later. Adults over 18 also should receive these two vaccines if they have a condition that compromises the immune system, or certain other medical conditions. Some experts recommend only the Pneumovax for healthy elderly.

    No vaccine is perfect, so it is still possible to get pneumococcal pneumonia after vaccination. There are many other types of pneumonia caused by organisms other than the one covered by the vaccine.

    The best estimate is that the vaccine prevents 50 to 80 per cent of severe pneumococcal disease. The most common side effects are a sore or swollen arm. Serious reactions are rare. Because of the significant benefit and small risk of harm, I recommend at least the PPSV23 pneumococcal vaccine for those over 65.

    S.C.

    The second issue is whether it is safe to do both cataract surgeries at the same time.

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    Vaccines Recommended For Adults Age 65 And Older

    Vaccines are an important step in protecting your health and the health of your family. Vaccines are particularly important for older adults. Risks to certain diseases are higher for this age group since it can be more difficult to fight off infections as your immune system naturally weakens as you get older.

    These infections, such as flu, pneumonia, shingles, tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough and COVID-19, increase your risk for complications, which can lead to long-term illness and hospitalization.

    There are five vaccines adults age 65 and older should consider to prevent certain diseases:

    • Influenza vaccine
    • Tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis vaccine
    • COVID-19 vaccine

    What If It Is Not Clear What A Person’s Vaccination History Is

    Confused About the Pneumococcal Vaccine Schedule? You’re Not Alone | The Morning Report

    When indicated, vaccines should be administered to patients with unknown vaccination status. All residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should have their vaccination status assessed and documented.

    How long must a person wait to receive other vaccinations?

    Inactivated influenza vaccine and tetanusvaccines may be given at the same time as or at any time before or after a dose of pneumococcus vaccine. There are no requirements to wait between the doses of these or any other inactivated vaccines.

    Vaccination of children recommended

    In July 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC jointly recommended childhood pneumococcal immunization, since pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States.

    “The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV13 or Prevnar 13, is currently recommended for all children younger than 5 years of age, all adults 65 years or older, and persons 6 through 64 years of age with certain medical conditions,” according to the 2014 AAP/CDC guidelines. “Pneumovax is a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that is currently recommended for use in all adults 65 years of age or older and for persons who are 2 years and older and at high risk for pneumococcal disease . PPSV23 is also recommended for use in adults 19 through 64 years of age who smoke cigarettes or who have asthma.”

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    How The Pneumococcal Vaccine Works

    Both types of pneumococcal vaccine encourage your body to produce antibodies against pneumococcal bacteria.

    Antibodies are proteins produced by the body to neutralise or destroy disease-carrying organisms and toxins.

    They protect you from becoming ill if you’re infected with the bacteria.

    More than 90 different strains of the pneumococcal bacterium have been identified, although most of these strains do not cause serious infections.

    The childhood vaccine protects against 13 strains of the pneumococcal bacterium, while the adult vaccine protects against 23 strains.

    Side Effects Of The Vaccines Against Pneumococcal Disease

    Vaccines against pneumococcal disease are effective and safe, although all medications can have unwanted side effects.

    Side effects from the vaccine are uncommon and usually mild, but may include:

    • localised pain, redness and swelling at the injection site
    • occasionally, an injection-site lump that may last many weeks
    • low-grade temperature .

    Read Also: Can You Pass Pneumonia To Another Person

    Questions To Ask Your Doctor

    • When should I make an appointment to get each type of pneumococcal vaccine?
    • Should I still get the vaccines if Ive recently had pneumonia?
    • Should I wait to turn 65 before I get each dose of pneumococcal vaccines?
    • If I have a negative reaction to one type of pneumococcal vaccine, am I likely to have that same reaction to the other?

    Funding was provided for these pneumococcal resources through an unrestricted grant from Pfizer Independent Grant for Learning and Change .

    Signs Of Pneumonia Vaccine Side Effects

    CDC H1N1 Flu

    As with any vaccination, there are potential side effects of the pneumonia vaccination. Common side effects include:

    Injection site soreness

    As with most shots and vaccinations, you may experience pain, swelling, or redness at the injection site .

    Less than 1% of people who receive a pneumonia vaccine develop a fever. If your temperature is above 100.4 F , you have a fever.

    Irritability

    Irritability is a feeling of agitation. When you’re feeling irritable, you’re more likely to become frustrated or upset. In children, this may present as fussiness.

    Recommended Reading: Why Does Arm Hurt After Pneumonia Shot

    Managing Fever After Immunisation

    Common side effects following immunisation are usually mild and temporary . Specific treatment is not usually required.

    There are a number of treatment options that can reduce the side effects of the vaccine including:

    • giving extra fluids to drink and not overdressing if there is a fever
    • although routine use of paracetamol after vaccination is not recommended, if fever is present, paracetamol can be given check the label for the correct dose or speak with your pharmacist, .

    Are You 65 Or Older Get Two Vaccinations Against Pneumonia

    • By Gregory Curfman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Former Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Health Publishing

    ARCHIVED CONTENT: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date each article was posted or last reviewed. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

    If you or a loved one is age 65 or older, getting vaccinated against pneumonia is a good idea so good that the Centers for Disease Control now recommends that everyone in this age group get vaccinated against pneumonia twice.

    This new recommendation is based on findings from a large clinical trial called CAPiTA, which were published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, sometimes just called pneumococcus, is a common bacterium that can cause serious lung infections like pneumonia. It can also cause invasive infections of the bloodstream, the tissues covering the brain and spinal cord , and other organs and tissues. Older individuals are especially prone to being infected by Pneumococcus, and these infections are often deadly.

    The dark spots are pneumonia-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria isolated from the blood of an infected person.

    One caveat is that while PCV13 is effective in preventing pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae, it does not prevent pneumonia caused by viruses or other bacteria.

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    How Should I Approach Getting Vaccinated

    Prioritizing is the name of the game plan during 2021 and 2022. Everyone really should’ve had the COVID vaccine by nowif they haven’t or they’re still sort of sitting on the fence, then preferably, the sooner the better, Dr. Wolfe says. Then, flu and/or pneumonia as you come into the winter.” Shingles is not seasonally dependent, “but people should talk to their doctor about it.

    Ideally, you can piggybank some of these vaccines together. For instance, COVID with flu, or flu with pneumonia, or shingles with flu. For many years, we’ve done flu and pneumonia together, Dr. Wolfe says. I think trying to give people three vaccines at once is probably asking for a bit much, but certainly two at once can be done with no concerns.

    Who Should Get Pneumococcal Vaccines

    Ask the Expert: Who should get a Pneumococcal Vaccine?

    CDC recommends pneumococcal vaccination for all children younger than 2 years old and all adults 65 years or older. In certain situations, older children and other adults should also get pneumococcal vaccines. Below is more information about who should and should not get each type of pneumococcal vaccine.

    Talk to your or your childs doctor about what is best for your specific situation.

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    What Are The Symptoms Of Pneumonia

    The signs and symptoms of pneumonia can range from mild to severe. The symptoms depend on the type of germ that caused the infection, your age and overall health. Mild signs and symptoms of pneumonia are often similar the symptoms of a cold or flu, but the effects of pneumonia last longer.

    Signs and symptoms of pneumonia may include:

    • Chest pain when you breathe or cough
    • Confusion or changes in mental awareness
    • Cough, which may produce phlegm
    • Fatigue
    • Fever, sweating and shaking chills
    • Lower-than-normal body temperature
    • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
    • Shortness of breath

    Newborns and infants may not show any sign or symptoms of the infection. However, they may vomit, have a fever, cough, be restless or tired, or have difficulty breathing and eating.

    Who Should Not Get These Vaccines

    Because of age or health conditions, some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait before getting them. Read the guidelines below specific to pneumococcal vaccines and ask your or your childs doctor for more information.

    Children younger than 2 years old should not get PPSV23. In addition, tell the person who is giving you or your child a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine if:

    You or your child have had a life-threatening allergic reaction or have a severe allergy.

    • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to any of the following should not get PCV13:
    • A shot of this vaccine
    • An earlier pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7
    • Any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid
  • Anyone who has had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PPSV23 should not get another shot.
  • Anyone with a severe allergy to any part of either of these vaccines should not get that vaccine. Your or your childs doctor can tell you about the vaccines ingredients.
  • You or your child are not feeling well.

    • People who have a mild illness, such as a cold, can probably get vaccinated. People who have a more serious illness should probably wait until they recover. Your or your childs doctor can advise you.

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    Everything You Need To Know About The Pneumonia Vaccine

    During the winter months, many people think that they have a nasty cold or flu, but it turns out to be pneumonia an illness that can be life threatening in certain people. A vaccine can help lower your chance of contracting pneumonia. While the pneumonia vaccine does not prevent all cases of pneumonia, it reduces the severity of the disease.

    That is especially important for older adults and if you have certain medical conditions that put you at greater risk for complications.

    Now is the time to talk to your doctor about your risks and if you need a vaccine to protect you against pneumonia.

    Niharika Juwarkar, MD, Internal Medicine with Firelands Physician Group, answers your most frequently asked questions about pneumonia and the risks.

    What is pneumonia?

    Pneumonia is a respiratory lung infection that is often mistaken for the flu. Your lungs become filled with fluid or pus that results in inflammation. Symptoms are very similar to the flu, but pneumonia can last for weeks and result in very serious complications.

    While pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi, most cases are due to a specific bacteria called streptococcus pneumoniae, more commonly known as pneumococcal pneumonia. This form can be treated with antibiotics. Your doctor can test to see what form of pneumonia you have. Treatment depends on the type of pneumonia you have and the severity of your symptoms. But, the best defense is vaccination.

    Who is most at risk for pneumonia?

    This Infectious Disease Can Pose A Serious Health Risk For Those Age 65 And Older But Two Vaccines Can Offer Sound Protection

    QUESTION: What and when to get a pneumonia shot for 65 and ...

    One of the leading health dangers for older adults is pneumonia. It is the most common cause of hospital admissions after childbirth. In fact, adults age 65 and older have a higher risk of death from pneumonia hospitalization than any other reason.

    Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs by bacteria, viruses, or other microbes. Most cases are caused by the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumonia, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, and Legionella pneumophila. A similar inflammation of the lung, called pneumonitis, can be caused by an inhaled chemical and is more common in people who have had strokes and have difficulty swallowing. A physical exam, chest x-ray, and blood test can confirm a diagnosis.

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