Monday, September 26, 2022

Where Can I Get The Pneumonia Shot

Who Needs One Or Two Pneumonia Vaccines

Do I need a pneumonia vaccine?

There are two pneumococcal vaccines, each working in a different way to maximize protection. PPSV23 protects against 23 strains of pneumococcal bacteria. Those 23 strains are about 90- to 95-plus percent of the strains that cause pneumonia in humans, Poland explains. PCV13, on the other hand, is a conjugate vaccine that protects against 13 strains of pneumococcal bacteria. PCV13 induces immunologic memory, he says. Your body will remember that it has encountered an antigen 20 years from now and develop antibodies to fight it off.

In order to get the best protection against all strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia, the CDC has long recommended that everyone 65 or older receive both vaccines: PCV13 , followed by the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine at a later visit. But the agency is now saying that PCV13 may not be necessary for healthy people 65 and older, suggesting that the decision be left up to patients and their physicians as to whether that extra skin prick is appropriate.

“Anyone who reaches the age of 65 and is in any way immunocompromised or has any of the listed indications for pneumococcal vaccine because they’re in a high-risk group for example, if they have diabetes, heart disease or lung disease, or are a smoker should continue to get both vaccines, says Schaffner.

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How Long Does A Pneumonia Shot Last

Streptococcus pneumoniaevaccinepneumoniaStreptococcus pneumoniae

  • Younger than 2 years old: four shots
  • 65 years old or older: two shots, which will last you the rest of your life
  • Between 2 and 64 years old: between one and three shots if you have certain immune system disorders or if youre a smoker

What You Should Know About Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both lungs that typically stems from several kinds of germs, most often bacteria and viruses.

Symptoms can develop gradually or suddenly. They include:

  • Fever.
  • Chest pain.
  • Loss of appetite.

Early detection is often challenging because many people with these symptoms assume they have a cold or the flu.

Its important to also note that the vaccine helps protect against some but not all bacterial pneumonia.

There are dozens of different types of bacterial pneumonia, says Dr. Suri. The vaccine will certainly reduce your risk of the most common bacterial pneumonia.

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Problems That Could Happen After Getting Any Injected Vaccine

  • People sometimes faint after a medical procedure, including vaccination. Sitting or lying down for about 15 minutes can help prevent fainting and injuries caused by a fall. Tell your doctor if you or your child:
  • Feel dizzy
  • Have vision changes
  • Have ringing in the ears
  • Some people get severe pain in the shoulder and have difficulty moving the arm where the doctor gave the shot. This happens very rarely.
  • Any medicine can cause a severe allergic reaction. Such reactions from a vaccine are very rare, estimated at about 1 in a million shots. These types of reactions would happen within a few minutes to a few hours after the vaccination.
  • As with any medicine, there is a very remote chance of a vaccine causing a serious injury or death.
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    Kids may have redness, tenderness, or swelling where the shot was given. A child also might have a fever after getting the shot. There is a very small chance of an allergic reaction with any vaccine.

    The pneumococcal vaccines contain only a small piece of the germ and so cannot cause pneumococcal disease.

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    Questions To Ask Your Doctor

    • When should I make an appointment to get each type of pneumococcal vaccine?
    • Should I still get the vaccines if Ive recently had pneumonia?
    • Should I wait to turn 65 before I get each dose of pneumococcal vaccines?
    • If I have a negative reaction to one type of pneumococcal vaccine, am I likely to have that same reaction to the other?

    Funding was provided for these pneumococcal resources through an unrestricted grant from Pfizer Independent Grant for Learning and Change .

    What Is The Pneumonia Vaccine

    The pneumonia vaccine is an injection that prevents you from contracting pneumococcal disease. There are two pneumococcal vaccines licensed by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States:

  • PCV13 Prevnar 13®: This vaccine helps protect against the 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria that most commonly cause serious infections in children and adults. Doctors give this vaccine to children at 12 through 15 months, 2, 4, and 6 years old. Adults who need this vaccine get just one shot.
  • PPSV23 Pneumovax23®: This vaccine helps protect against serious infections caused by 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria. Doctors give a single shot of this vaccine to people who need it, but the CDC recommends one or two additional shots for people with certain chronic medical conditions.
  • The Center for Disease Control recommends the PCV13 vaccine for:

    • All children younger than 2 years old
    • People 2 years or older with certain medical conditions

    The CDC recommends PPSV23 for:

    • All adults 65 years or older
    • People 2 through 64 years old with certain medical conditions
    • Smokers 19 through 64 years old

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    About The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Pneumonia is a common enough illness, but its one that can have potentially devastating reactions. Fortunately, theres a way to prevent the serious side effects of the disease, and possibly prevent someone from getting it to begin with.

    The pneumonia vaccine is a safe way to prevent most cases, and effectively lowers the chances of catching the disease entirely. People who do get pneumonia after getting the pneumonia vaccination anyway will have a much milder case of the disease if they do happen to contract it.

    Is It Safe To Get The Flu Shot And The Pneumonia Shot At The Same Time

    How long should you wait to get the COVID-19 vaccine after getting a pneumonia shot?

    Is It Safe To Get The Flu Shot And The Pneumonia Shot At The Same Time. According to centers for disease control. If you and your doctor decide that you need to have a pneumonia vaccine, you can get it done at any time of the year.

    Flu symptoms because pneumonia is a lung infection, it typically has more respiratory symptoms, while the flu is accompanied by muscular aches and pains and fatigue, she. Influenza vaccine can be given at the same time as other vaccines, including pneumococcal vaccine. Yes, you can get your covid booster and flu shot at the same time.

    Source: vim.mankillerfdn.org

    yes! said tim heider, a spokesperson for the oregon health authority. According to centers for disease control.

    Source: offshorewinddc.org

    People with diabetes are about three times more likely to die with flu and pneumococcal diseases, yet most dont get a simple, safe pneumonia shot. If you and your doctor decide that you need to have a pneumonia vaccine, you can get it done at any time of the year.

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    Who Shouldn’t Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

    If you don’t meet the recommendations for the pneumonia vaccine, you really don’t need to get it, pulmonary critical care expert Reynold Panettieri, MD, director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Science at Rutgers University, tells Health. “It’s a risk-benefit ratio,” he explains. “If you’re under 65 and are otherwise healthy, your likelihood of developing pneumococcal pneumonia is unlikely,” he says.

    But there are some people who explicitly shouldn’t get the vaccines, per the CDC. Those include:

    • People who have had a life-threatening allergic reaction to PCV13, PPSV23, an early pneumococcal conjugate vaccine called PCV7, the DTaP vaccine, or any parts of these vaccines. Talk to your doctor if you’re unsure.
    • People who are currently ill.

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    What About The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Prevnar 13 is a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine that protects against 13 types of pneumococcal bacteria.

    Pneumovax 23 is a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that protects against 23 types of pneumococcal bacteria.

    Once vaccinated, most healthy adults develop protection to most or all of these types within two to three weeks.

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    Who Should Not Get The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Again, its best to determine this with your doctor, but as a general rule the CDC states you should not get the pneumococcal vaccine if:

    • You or your child has had a severe or life-threatening allergy to the current PCV13 or Prevnar 13®) vaccine, the past PCV7 vaccine or any vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid.
    • You or your child are currently battling a severe illness.

    What To Know About The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Why we might not get a coronavirus vaccine ...

    Who needs it: The CDC recommends one pneumococcal vaccine for adults 19 to 64 with certain risk factors . If you work around chronically ill people say, in a hospital or nursing home you should get the vaccine, even if you’re healthy. People 65 and older can discuss with their health care provider whether they should get PCV13 if they haven’t previously received a dose. A dose of PPSV23 is recommended for those 65 and older, regardless of previous inoculations with pneumococcal vaccines.

    How often: Space immunizations out. You should receive a dose of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine , then, a year later, a dose of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine . People with any of the risk factors should get one dose of PCV13 and PPSV23 before age 65, separated by eight weeks.

    Why you need it: Pneumococcal disease, which can cause pneumonia, kills around 3,000 people a year. Young children and those over 65 have the highest incidence of serious illness, and older adults are more likely to die from it.

    Editors note: This article was published on Oct. 26, 2020. It was updated in September 2021 with new information.

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    When To Get The Vaccine

    Thereâs no such thing as pneumonia season, like flu season. If you and your doctor decide that you need to have a pneumonia vaccine, you can get it done at any time of the year. If itâs flu season, you can even get a pneumonia vaccine at the same time that you get a flu vaccine, as long as you receive each shot in a different arm.

    Pneumonia Treatments And Covid

    According to the World Health Organization , bacterial pneumonia should be treated with antibiotics, which are usually prescribed at a health center.

    If your symptoms are severe, it is important that you call your healthcare provideror seek immediate helpto get the proper treatment. Severe symptoms include:

    • Difficulty breathing
    • Bluish color in your lips or fingertips
    • A high fever
    • Cough with mucus that is severe or worsening

    Although COVID-19 is caused by a virus, people with the illness can still develop a superinfection, which is a reinfection or secondary infection caused by bacteria. If this happens, antibiotics will be given to the patient. In order to prevent antibiotic resistance, when antibiotics become useless against bacteria, some researchers have suggested following antimicrobial stewardship principles .

    Moreover, because severe cases of pneumonia may require treatment at a hospital, healthcare providers must consider the chance that a patient may acquire coinfections in hospitals. So, to be safe and not add to superinfection among hospitalized patients, antibiotics are warranted.

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    Complications Of Pneumonia Caused By Covid

    Because pneumonia causes the alveoli in the lungs to fill with pus and fluid, breathing can be painful and difficult.

    Pneumonia can cause serious health complications, including:

    Because COVID-19 attacks the lungs, it would make sense that having COVID-19 would cause lung complications. As of yet, not enough data are available to support this conclusion.

    However, as noted above, research does show that COVID-19 can cause severe illness, including pneumonia that can be fatal. A 2020 study by the CDC found that among a group of people with COVID-19, about 70% had complications from pneumonia. Also, people with COVID-19 were twice as likely to get pneumonia compared to people with the flu.

    Regarding long-lasting complications from COVID-19, it is still too soon to say for sure whether “long-haulers” are more likely to have underlying chronic medical conditions.

    What Are The Side Effects Of The Pneumonia Vaccine

    COVID-19: The Pneumonia Vaccine & Coronavirus

    Most people don’t usually have serious side effects from either vaccine, but it’s possible to have some mild symptoms.

    The most common side effects with PCV13 include:

    • Redness where the shot was given.
    • Swelling where the shot was given.
    • Pain or tenderness where the shot was given.
    • Fever.

    The most common side effects with PPSV23 include:

    • Redness where the shot was given.
    • Pain where the shot was given.
    • Fever.
    • Muscle aches.

    If you do happen to have side effects, CDC says they’ll usually go away within two days.

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    Babies And The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Babies are routinely vaccinated with a type of pneumococcal vaccine known as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as part of their childhood vaccination programme.

    Babies born on or after 1 January 2020 have 2 injections, which are usually given at:

    • 12 weeks old
    • 1 year old

    Babies born before this date will continue to be offered 3 doses, at 8 and 16 weeks and a booster at 1 year.

    Pfizer Study Shows Covid

    A nurses fills up syringes for patients as they receive their coronavirus disease booster vaccination during a Pfizer-BioNTech vaccination clinic in Southfield, Michigan, U.S., September 29, 2021. REUTERS/Emily Elconin

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    Jan 12 – Pfizer Inc said on Wednesday booster doses of its COVID-19 vaccine can be administered along with its pneumonia vaccine and produced strong safety and immune responses in people aged 65 and above in a late-stage study.

    The study, initiated in May, tested the company’s next-generation pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PREVNAR 20, with a third dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot in 570 participants.

    The aim of the study was to test the safety of the combination and the immune response after adding the pneumonia vaccine to the existing COVID-19 vaccine.

    Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

    The company said responses elicited by PREVNAR 20 and booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine were similar when given together or with placebo.

    The data provides evidence supporting the potential to administer PREVNAR 20 and the company’s COVID-19 vaccine at the same time, reducing the number of visits people make to doctors or pharmacies for recommended immunization, Pfizer said.

    PREVNAR 20 was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in June last year to help protect adults against most invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia.

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    What Is The Pneumonia Shot

    The pneumonia shot is a vaccine that keeps you from getting pneumonia. There are two types of vaccines. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is primarily for children under age two, though it can be given to older ages, as well. The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is for adults over age 65.

    The pneumonia vaccine for older adults is one dose. Unlike the flu vaccine, you dont get it every year.

    The vaccine teaches your body to make proteins that will destroy the pneumonia bacteria. These proteins are called antibodies and they will protect you and keep you from getting infected. The pneumonia vaccines dont have live bacteria or viruses in them, so you wont get pneumonia from the vaccine.

    Continued

    You should have the pneumonia vaccine if you:

    • Are over age 65
    • Have a long-term health problem
    • Asthma
  • Have a weak immune system
  • Smoke
  • Vaccines dont prevent all pneumonia, but people who get the shot dont get as sick as those who dont have it. Benefits of the vaccine include:

    • Milder infections
    • Ringing in your ears
    • Sweating

    If you know you dont like needles or feel worried before getting a vaccine, you can try to look away while you have the shot. You can also try a relaxation technique like deep breathing or visualization to help you feel calm.

    Older people are more likely to have long-term health problems that can make getting an infection dangerous. The pneumonia shot is recommended for most people.

    Continued

    Q: Ive Heard That The Pneumonia Shot Will Help Protect Me Against Getting Sick From Coronavirus Is That True

    Pneumococcal Vaccine Market 2020 Industry Size by Global ...

    A: The pneumonia shot can help protect you against getting really sick with other types of viruses, like influenza, but not from the coronavirus, which causes pneumonia all by itself.

    Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services.Policy

    Often times, we see that influenza can lead to secondary infections with other types of bacteria that the pneumonia shot prevents. But because coronavirus is bad enough on its own, the pneumonia shot doesnt offer protection against it.

    Still, its important for some people to get the pneumonia shot, regardless of COVID-19. The germs that cause pneumonia are still out there, they arent waiting on the sidelines for coronavirus to finish its job.

    The pneumonia shot is recommended for the following groups:

    • Allbabies and children younger than 2 years old.
    • Alladults 65 years or older.
    • Adults19 through 64 years old who smoke cigarettes.
    • Childrenolder than 2 and adults younger than 65 who have certain chronic diseases.
    • Thosewho are at increased risk for certain diseases and those who have impaired immune systems.

    If you fall into one of these categories, talk to your doctor about getting the pneumonia shot to help protect you from getting really sick from other viruses. But when it comes down to it, the pneumonia shot doesnt offer protection specifically against coronavirus.

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