Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Where Do You Give Pneumonia Vaccine

How Does The Pneumonia Vaccine Work

Can a Flu Vaccine Give You the Flu?

Pneumococcal vaccines guard against the most common cause of pneumonia in the United States pneumococcal bacteria. These same bacteria can also cause bacteremia or meningitis . There are two types of pneumococcal vaccines available, PCV13 and PPSV23 your Rite Aid Pharmacist or physician can determine if and when one, or both, of these vaccines is needed. While receiving the pneumococcal vaccine is the best way to prevent pneumonia, it cannot deter every single case of pneumonia. But shielded with it, you are likely to have a milder case and fewer major complications.

In addition to the pneumococcal vaccine, there are several other immunizations that prevent infection by bacteria or viruses that may cause pneumonia. These vaccines include:

  • Haemophilus influenzae type b ,
  • pertussis ,

Effectiveness Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

Children respond very well to the pneumococcal vaccine.

The introduction of this vaccine into the NHS childhood vaccination schedule has resulted in a large reduction in pneumococcal disease.

The pneumococcal vaccine given to older children and adults is thought to be around 50 to 70% effective at preventing pneumococcal disease.

Both types of pneumococcal vaccine are inactivated or “killed” vaccines and do not contain any live organisms. They cannot cause the infections they protect against.

Ppsv23 Vaccination In At

It is recommended that at-risk children receive immunization with PPSV23 after they finish an immunization series with conjugated vaccines. In sickle cell pediatric patients, higher titers of the 7 serotypes contained in PCV7 were observed in patients receiving immunization with PCV7 series followed by PPSV23 compared to patients who received the PCV7 series alone. In HIV-positive pediatric patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy, a series of two PCV7 vaccinations followed by a PPSV23 vaccination increased antibody titers. Due to increased titers from PPVS23 vaccination, children who are immunocompromised should receive a single immunization with PPSV23 after the PCV13 vaccination series. For children who have sickle cell disease and/or functional or anatomical asplenia, two doses of PPSV23 are recommended. The first dose is recommended 8 weeks after finishing the PCV13 vaccine series. The second dose is recommended 3 to 5 years after the first dose according to the 2002 National Heart Lung and Blood Institutes Management of Sickle Cell Disease guidelines or 5 years after the first dose according to the 2010 Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices guidelines., Decreased duration between revaccination with PPSV23 has led to increased occurrences of mild vaccine-related adverse events in adults and should be considered when deciding PPSV23 revaccination scheduling in pediatric sickle cell patients.

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Are You 65 Or Older Get Two Vaccinations Against Pneumonia

  • By Gregory Curfman, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Former Editor-in-Chief, Harvard Health Publishing

ARCHIVED CONTENT: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date each article was posted or last reviewed. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

If you or a loved one is age 65 or older, getting vaccinated against pneumonia is a good idea so good that the Centers for Disease Control now recommends that everyone in this age group get vaccinated against pneumonia twice.

This new recommendation is based on findings from a large clinical trial called CAPiTA, which were published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Streptococcus pneumoniae, sometimes just called pneumococcus, is a common bacterium that can cause serious lung infections like pneumonia. It can also cause invasive infections of the bloodstream, the tissues covering the brain and spinal cord , and other organs and tissues. Older individuals are especially prone to being infected by Pneumococcus, and these infections are often deadly.

The dark spots are pneumonia-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria isolated from the blood of an infected person.

One caveat is that while PCV13 is effective in preventing pneumonia caused by S. pneumoniae, it does not prevent pneumonia caused by viruses or other bacteria.

What Are The Most Common Side Effects Of Pneumovax 23 And Prevnar 13

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Side effects with pneumococcal vaccines are usually mild and go away on their own within a few days.

Common side effects of Prevnar 13 include:

  • Injection site pain

  • Fever

Common side effects of Pneumovax 23 include:

  • Injection site pain

  • Fever

  • Muscle aches

  • Fatigue

Be sure to talk with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms for a prolonged period of time.

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What Is Prevnar 13

Prevnar 13 is used to help prevent disease caused by pneumococcal bacteria. This vaccine contains 13 different types of pneumococcal bacteria.

Pneumococcal disease is a serious infection caused by a bacteria. Pneumococcal bacteria can infect the sinuses and inner ear. It can also infect the lungs, blood, and brain, and these conditions can be fatal.

Prevnar 13 works by exposing you to a small amount of the bacteria or a protein from the bacteria, which causes the body to develop immunity to the disease. Prevnar 13 will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

Pneumococcal 13-valent vaccine is for use in adults and children at least 6 weeks old.

Prevnar 13 helps your body develop immunity to the disease, but will not treat an active infection you already have.

Like any vaccine, Prevnar 13 may not provide protection from disease in every person.

Signs Of Pneumonia Vaccine Side Effects

As with any vaccination, there are potential side effects of the pneumonia vaccination. Common side effects include:

Injection site soreness

As with most shots and vaccinations, you may experience pain, swelling, or redness at the injection site .

Less than 1% of people who receive a pneumonia vaccine develop a fever. If your temperature is above 100.4 F , you have a fever.

Irritability

Irritability is a feeling of agitation. When you’re feeling irritable, you’re more likely to become frustrated or upset. In children, this may present as fussiness.

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Pneumococcal Disease In Children

In children, the most common manifestation is bacteraemia without focus. This accounts for approximately 70% of IPD, followed by pneumonia with bacteraemia.

Meningitis is the least common but most severe category of IPD

  • irritability
  • seizures

Acute otitis media is the most common non-invasive manifestation of pneumococcal disease in children. Streptococcus pneumoniae is detected in 2855% of middle ear aspirates from children with acute otitis media.34,38,39

Pneumococcal disease in adults

In adults, pneumonia with bacteraemia is the most common manifestation of IPD

  • more than one-third of all community-acquired pneumonia
  • up to half of hospitalised pneumonia in adults

However, it is difficult to accurately determine the proportion attributable to pneumococci in cases of non-bacteraemic pneumonia.

Symptoms of pneumonia include:

  • chest pain

Adults At High Risk Of Ipd

How long should you wait to get the COVID-19 vaccine after getting a pneumonia shot?

Adults with immunocompromising conditions resulting in high risk of IPD, except HSCT, should receive 1 dose of Pneu-C-13 vaccine followed at least 8 weeks later by 1 dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine, if not previously received. The dose of Pneu-C-13 vaccine should be administered at least 1 year after any previous dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Refer to Immunocompromised persons for information about immunization of HSCT recipients.

Immunocompetent adults with conditions or lifestyle factors resulting in high risk of IPD should receive 1 dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine, if not previously received. One dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine is also recommended for all adults who are residents of long-term care facilities and should be considered for individuals who use illicit drugs.

Some experts also suggest a dose of Pneu-C-13 vaccine, followed by Pneu-P-23 vaccine, for immunocompetent adults with conditions resulting in high risk of IPD as this may theoretically improve antibody response and immunologic memory. However, Pneu-P-23 vaccine is the vaccine of choice for these individuals, and if only one vaccine can be provided, it should be Pneu-P-23 vaccine, because of the greater number of serotypes included in the vaccine.

Adults at highest risk of IPD should also receive 1 booster dose of Pneu-P-23 vaccine refer to Booster doses and re-immunization.

Table 4 – provides recommended schedules for adult immunization with pneumococcal vaccines.

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How Effective Is Each Vaccine

Vaccines help protect against disease, but no vaccine is 100% effective.

Studies show that at least one dose of Prevnar 13 protects 80% of babies from serious pneumococcal infections, 75% of adults age 65 and older from invasive pneumococcal disease , and 45% of adults age 65 and older from pneumococcal pneumonia.

Studies show that one dose of Pneumovax 23 protects 50% to 85% of healthy adults against invasive pneumococcal disease.

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Indication For Pneumovax 23

PNEUMOVAX®23 is a vaccine indicated for active immunization for the prevention of pneumococcal disease caused by the 23 serotypes contained in the vaccine .

PNEUMOVAX 23 is approved for use in persons 50 years of age or older and persons aged 2 years who are at increased risk for pneumococcal disease.

PNEUMOVAX 23 will not prevent disease caused by capsular types of pneumococcus other than those contained in the vaccine.

Groups At Risk Of Ipd

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People who are immunocompromised and unable to mount an adequate immune response to pneumococcal capsular antigens have the highest risk of IPD.2,4,34 This includes people with asplenia.

Greater risk and/or severity of IPD

  • excessive alcohol consumption
  • certain non-immunocompromising chronic medical conditions2,34,42,43

Indigenous populations in developed countries, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia, have a disproportionately high burden of IPD

Young children and elderly people have the highest incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease .37,38,45 Disease burden is also disproportionately high in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.1,2

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What Are The Side Effects Of The Pneumonia Vaccine

Most people don’t usually have serious side effects from either vaccine, but it’s possible to have some mild symptoms.

The most common side effects with PCV13 include:

  • Redness where the shot was given.
  • Swelling where the shot was given.
  • Pain or tenderness where the shot was given.
  • Fever.

The most common side effects with PPSV23 include:

  • Redness where the shot was given.
  • Pain where the shot was given.
  • Fever.
  • Muscle aches.

If you do happen to have side effects, CDC says they’ll usually go away within two days.

Route Site And Needle Size

Administer pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Administer pneumococcal conjugate vaccine intramuscularly. The preferred site for infants and young children is the vastus lateralis muscle in the anterolateral thigh. The preferred injection site in older children and adults is the deltoid muscle. Use a needle length appropriate for the age and size of the person receiving the vaccine.

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Summary Of Information Contained In This Naci Statement

The following highlights key information for immunization providers. Please refer to the remainder of the Statement for details.

1. What

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a bacterium that can cause many types of diseases including invasive pneumococcal disease , and community-acquired pneumonia .

For the prevention of diseases caused by S. pneumoniae in adults, two types of vaccines are available in Canada: pneumococcal 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine containing 23 pneumococcal serotypes and pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine containing 13 pneumococcal serotypes.

NACI has been tasked with providing a recommendation from a public health perspective on the use of pneumococcal vaccines in adults who are 65 years of age and older, following the implementation of routine childhood pneumococcal vaccine programs in Canada.

2. Who

Information in this statement is intended for provinces and territories making decisions for publicly funded, routine, immunization programs for adults who are 65 years of age and older without risk factors increasing their risk of IPD. These recommendations supplement the recent NACI recommendations on this topic that were issued for individual-level decision making in 2016.

3. How

4. Why

Everything You Need To Know About The Pneumonia Vaccine

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During the winter months, many people think that they have a nasty cold or flu, but it turns out to be pneumonia an illness that can be life threatening in certain people. A vaccine can help lower your chance of contracting pneumonia. While the pneumonia vaccine does not prevent all cases of pneumonia, it reduces the severity of the disease.

That is especially important for older adults and if you have certain medical conditions that put you at greater risk for complications.

Now is the time to talk to your doctor about your risks and if you need a vaccine to protect you against pneumonia.

Niharika Juwarkar, MD, Internal Medicine with Firelands Physician Group, answers your most frequently asked questions about pneumonia and the risks.

What is pneumonia?

Pneumonia is a respiratory lung infection that is often mistaken for the flu. Your lungs become filled with fluid or pus that results in inflammation. Symptoms are very similar to the flu, but pneumonia can last for weeks and result in very serious complications.

While pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi, most cases are due to a specific bacteria called streptococcus pneumoniae, more commonly known as pneumococcal pneumonia. This form can be treated with antibiotics. Your doctor can test to see what form of pneumonia you have. Treatment depends on the type of pneumonia you have and the severity of your symptoms. But, the best defense is vaccination.

Who is most at risk for pneumonia?

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Persons New To Canada

Health care providers who see persons newly arrived in Canada should review the immunization status and update immunization for these individuals, as necessary. Review of pneumococcal vaccination status is particularly important for persons from areas of the world where sickle cell disease is present, as persons with sickle cell disease are at risk of serious pneumococcal infections. In many countries outside of Canada, pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is in limited use. Refer to Immunization of Persons New to Canada in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of people who are new to Canada.

People With Medical Risk Factors

In addition to the 3 doses of 13vPCV routinely recommended for healthy non-Indigenous children < 5 years of age, children 12 months of age with risk conditions for pneumococcal disease are recommended to receive:

  • An additional dose of at 6 months of age
  • a dose of at 4 years of age
  • a 2nd dose of at least 5 years after the 1st dose of 23vPPV

This is because of the higher disease burden and the possibility of lower antibody responses in these children.2-4

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children diagnosed with risk conditions at 12 months of age who live in the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia already receive these extra doses as part of their routine schedule.

Any child aged 6 to 11 months with a newly identified risk condition who has not received an additional dose of 13vPCV at 6 months of age should receive this dose at diagnosis. The exception is children who have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant these children are recommended to receive 3 doses of 13vPCV after transplantation, followed by 2 doses of 23vPPV

All children and adults with newly identified risk conditions are recommended to receive:

  • 1 dose of at diagnosis (at least 2 months after any previous doses of 13vPCV
  • or at 4 years of age whichever is later
  • a 2nd dose of 23vPPV at least 5 years later

See also Vaccine information and Variations from product information for more details.

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Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander People

In addition to the 3 doses for all children < 5 years of age, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children living in the following states and territories are recommended to receive an additional dose of 13vPCV at 6 months of age:

  • Northern Territory

This is because of the higher risk of pneumococcal disease in these children.1

These children are also recommended to receive 2 doses of 23vPPV

  • 1 dose at 4 years of age
  • a 2nd dose at least 5 years later

This is because a considerable proportion of pneumococcal disease in these children is caused by serotypes that are present in 23vPPV13vPCV.

For children aged > 12 months who have not completed a full course of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, the timing and number of further doses for catch-up vaccination depends on:

  • the childs age
  • any previous doses they received

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults without risk conditions for pneumococcal disease are recommended to receive:

  • a dose of
  • at least 5 years later

This is based on:

  • the increased risk of pneumococcal disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults, compared with non-Indigenous adults
  • the high proportion of invasive pneumococcal disease caused by additional serotypes only in 23vPPV

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults who have previously received 23vPPV

  • 12 months after their last 23vPPV
  • dose, or 5 years after their previous 23vPPV dose, whichever is later. If they have already received at least 2 doses of 23vPPV

What If It Is Not Clear What A Person’s Vaccination History Is

Does Medicare cover tetanus shots?

When indicated, vaccines should be administered to patients with unknown vaccination status. All residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should have their vaccination status assessed and documented.

How long must a person wait to receive other vaccinations?

Inactivated influenza vaccine and tetanusvaccines may be given at the same time as or at any time before or after a dose of pneumococcus vaccine. There are no requirements to wait between the doses of these or any other inactivated vaccines.

Vaccination of children recommended

In July 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC jointly recommended childhood pneumococcal immunization, since pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States.

“The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, PCV13 or Prevnar 13, is currently recommended for all children younger than 5 years of age, all adults 65 years or older, and persons 6 through 64 years of age with certain medical conditions,” according to the 2014 AAP/CDC guidelines. “Pneumovax is a 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine that is currently recommended for use in all adults 65 years of age or older and for persons who are 2 years and older and at high risk for pneumococcal disease . PPSV23 is also recommended for use in adults 19 through 64 years of age who smoke cigarettes or who have asthma.”

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