Wednesday, September 28, 2022

Which Pneumonia Shot Is Given First

Side Effects Of The Pneumococcal Vaccine

Health Min Dr. Harsh Vardhan Launches India’s Indigenous 1st Pneumococcal Vaccine ‘Pneumosil’

Like most vaccines, the childhood and adult versions of the pneumococcal vaccine can sometimes cause mild side effects.

These include:

  • redness where the injection was given
  • hardness or swelling where the injection was given

There are no serious side effects listed for either the childhood or adult versions of the vaccine, apart from an extremely rare risk of a severe allergic reaction .

Patients In Health Care Institutions

Residents of long-term care facilities should receive Pneu-P-23 vaccine. Refer to Recommendations for Use for information about pneumococcal vaccination of individuals at increased risk of IPD. Refer to Immunization of Patients in Health Care Institutions in Part 3 for additional information about vaccination of patients in health care institutions.

How Long Is Pneumonia Contagious

It is impossible to say with certainty exactly how long an adult or child with pneumonia is contagious, since this varies according to the type of germ or organism that caused the pneumonia. This contagious period can range from one to two days to weeks. In general, while an infected person is coughing or sneezing, there is the potential to release contaminated droplets into the air.

Many bacterial pneumonias are much less contagious after antibiotics have been taken for about 24-48 hours. However, this time period may vary for some organisms. For example, with tuberculosis, it can take two weeks or more of antibiotics before the person is no longer contagious. With viral pneumonias, the patient becomes less contagious after the symptoms have improved, especially fever. Some people with viral pneumonia may not be contagious after one to two days with no fever, but others may still shed some infectious virus particles for a much longer time.

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What Is A Pneumococcal Vaccine

A pneumococcal vaccine is an injection that can prevent pneumococcal disease. A pneumococcal disease is any illness that is caused by pneumococcal bacteria, including pneumonia. In fact, the most common cause of pneumonia is pneumococcal bacteria. This type of bacteria can also cause ear infections, sinus infections, and meningitis.

Adults age 65 or older are amongst the highest risk groups for getting pneumococcal disease.

To prevent pneumococcal disease, there are two types of pneumococcal vaccines: the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine .

Symptoms And Causative Agent

Prevention of Pneumococcal Disease: Recommendations of the ...

Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria, also called pneumococcal bacteria, pneumococci , and pneumococcus , are one of the leading causes of illness in young children. At least 90 types of pneumococcal bacteria are known to exist. As the name implies, they can cause pneumonia however, these bacteria also can cause bloodstream infections , meningitis, sinusitis, and middle ear infection, among other illnesses. Collectively, the different illnesses caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae are referred to as pneumococcal disease.

Symptoms of pneumococcal disease vary based on the specific illness the bacteria have caused. Pneumococcal pneumonia symptoms include fever, chest pain, cough, and shortness of breath. When pneumococci infect normally sterile locations, so-called invasive pneumococcal disease may result. The two major types of invasive pneumococcal disease are bacteremia and meningitis . Pneumococcal meningitis symptoms include fever, headache, stiffness in the neck, light sensitivity, and disorientation. Pneumococcal bacteremia may complicate localized infections such as pneumonia and is commonly associated with high fever and shaking chills.

Invasive pneumococcal disease can be fatal survivors of meningitis may have permanent injury, including brain damage, seizures, or hearing loss.

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How Long Does A Pneumonia Shot Last

Streptococcus pneumoniaevaccinepneumoniaStreptococcus pneumoniae

  • Younger than 2 years old: four shots
  • 65 years old or older: two shots, which will last you the rest of your life
  • Between 2 and 64 years old: between one and three shots if you have certain immune system disorders or if youre a smoker

Is It True That More Than One Type Of Infection Can Cause Meningitis

Yes. Everyone has heard it on the news the story of a local student infected with meningitis. Such a report inevitably results in many questions and a great amount of concern and even fear among families with children in the affected school.

There are some important considerations when this happens. First, it is important to remember that meningitis refers to an infection that has reached the lining of the brain and spinal cord. Second, it can be caused by viruses or bacteria .

Viral meningitis, the most common type of meningitis, is often less severe than bacterial meningitis. Vaccine-preventable diseases that can cause viral meningitis include measles, mumps, chickenpox and influenza.

Most, but not all, cases of bacterial meningitis can be prevented by vaccination. The bacteria most often associated with meningitis include meningococcus, pneumococcus, and Haemophilus influenzae type B . Fortunately, by the age of 2, most children are fully immunized against pneumococcus and Hib and most adolescents are protected against meningococcus.

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Annual Updates To The Immunization Schedule 1995 To 2010

As more vaccines became available, an annual update to the schedule was important because of changes that providers needed to know, such as detailed information about who should receive each vaccine, age of receipt, number of doses, time between doses, or use of combination vaccines. New vaccines were also added.

Important changes to the schedule between 1995 and 2010 included:

  • New vaccines: Varicella , rotavirus hepatitis A pneumococcal vaccine
  • Additional recommendations for existing vaccines: influenza hepatitis A
  • New versions of existing vaccines: acellular pertussis vaccine intranasal influenza
  • Discontinuation of vaccine: Oral polio vaccine

2000 | Recommended Vaccines

* Given in combination as DTaP** Given in combination as MMR

What Tests Diagnose Pneumonia

Senior residents in Manila administered with flu, pneumonia vaccines

The diagnosis of pneumonia always begins with taking a medical history and performing a physical examination to look for characteristic signs. In particular, listening to the lungs may reveal areas where sound is diminished, wheezing, or crackling sounds in affected areas. Some commonly performed diagnostic tests are as follows:

  • A chest X-ray is able to illustrate whether or not pneumonia is present, but it does not provide information about the organism responsible for the infection.
  • In some cases, a chest CT scan may be performed. This will reveal more detail than the chest X-ray.
  • Pulse oximetry measures the amount of oxygen in the bloodstream. The test involves a painless sensor attached to the finger or ear. Blood levels of oxygen may be reduced in pneumonia.
  • Microbiology tests to identify the causative organism. Tests may be performed on blood or sputum. Rapid urine tests are available to identify Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila. Cultures of blood or sputum not only identify the responsible organism but can also be examined to determine which antibiotics are effective against a particular bacterial strain.
  • Bronchoscopy is a procedure in which a thin, lighted tube is inserted into the trachea and major airways. This allows the doctor to visualize the inside of the airways and take tissue samples if needed. Bronchoscopy may be performed in patients with severe pneumonia or if pneumonia worsens despite antibiotic treatment.

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New Recommendations For Pneumonia Vaccines Prevnar 13 And Pneumovax 23

There are 1.7 million people in the United States visiting emergency departments with pneumonia as the primary diagnosis, according to an annual National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and about 50,000 people die every year due to pneumonia. This is why its essential for vulnerable populations to protect themselves from this disease, especially older adults.

Can The Pneumonia Vaccine Prevent Pneumonia

    It is not possible to prevent all types of pneumonia, but one can take steps to reduce the chance of contracting the condition by quitting smoking, practicing good hand-washing, and avoiding contact with people who have colds, the flu, or other infections.

    A vaccine is available against the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia, Streptococcus pneumoniae . There are two types of vaccine: PPSV23 , a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine against 23 types of the bacteria, and PCV13 , a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine that protects against 13 types of the bacteria. These vaccines may not always prevent pneumococcal pneumonia, but they may prevent serious complications of pneumonia if it does occur.

    Avoidance of areas where fungal pathogens are endemic is recommended to prevent fungal pneumonias. There is no antifungal vaccine available however, for some high-risk patients, some doctors have recommended prophylactic antifungal drugs.

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    What Are The Most Common Side Effects Of Pneumovax 23 And Prevnar 13

    Side effects with pneumococcal vaccines are usually mild and go away on their own within a few days.

    Common side effects of Prevnar 13 include:

    • Injection site pain

    • Fever

    Common side effects of Pneumovax 23 include:

    • Injection site pain

    • Fever

    • Muscle aches

    • Fatigue

    Be sure to talk with your doctor if you experience any of these symptoms for a prolonged period of time.

    Which Adults Should Get The Pneumococcal Vaccine

    Pneumonia: Vaccine Given

    The following groups of adults should get both types of the pneumococcal vaccine :

    • Adults 65 years and older because they are at high risk of pneumococcal infections
    • Adults without a functioning spleen
    • Adults who are immune compromised by disease, chemotherapy or steroids
    • Individuals who are HIV positive

    The following groups of adults should get the polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine regardless of age:

    • Adults who smoke or suffer from alcoholism
    • Adults with heart or lung disease, liver disease, asthma, diabetes or cancer

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    How Supplied/storage And Handling

    Pneumovax 23 is supplied as follows:

    NDC 0006-4943-00 a box of 10 single-dose vials, color coded with a purple cap and stripe on the vial labels and cartons.

    NDC 0006-4837-03 a box of 10 single-dose, pre-filled Luer-Lok syringes with tip caps, color coded with a violet plunger rod and purple stripe on the syringe labels and cartons.

    Storage and Handling

    • Store at 2-8°C .
    • All vaccine must be discarded after the expiration date.

    The vial stoppers, syringe plunger stopper and syringe tip cap are not made with natural rubber latex.

    Medical Conditions Resulting In High Risk Of Ipd

    Table 1: Medical Conditions Resulting in High risk of IPD

    Non-immunocompromising conditions

    IPD is more common in the winter and spring in temperate climates.

    Spectrum of clinical illness

    Although asymptomatic upper respiratory tract colonization is common, infection with S. pneumoniae may result in severe disease. IPD is a severe form of infection that occurs when S. pneumoniae invades normally sterile sites, such as the bloodstream or central nervous system. Bacteremia and meningitis are the most common manifestations of IPD in children 2 years of age and younger. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is the most common presentation among adults and is a common complication following influenza. The case fatality rate of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is 5% to 7% and is higher among elderly persons. Bacterial spread within the respiratory tract may result in AOM, sinusitis or recurrent bronchitis.

    Disease distribution

    Worldwide, pneumococcal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The World Health Organization estimates that almost 500,000 deaths among children aged less than 5 years are attributable to pneumococcal disease each year. In Canada, IPD is most common among the very young and adults over 65 years of age.

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    Are Side Effects Associated With The Pneumonia Vaccine

    Side effects of PCV13 in children include drowsiness, temporary loss of appetite, or redness, swelling, or tenderness where the shot was given. Mild fever and irritability are other common side effects. Adults receiving pneumococcal vaccines have reported pain, redness, rash, and swelling where the shot was given also mild fever, fatigue, headache, chills, or muscle pain.

    Any type of vaccine has the potential to cause an allergic reaction, which can be severe, but this side effect is rare. This would happen within minutes to a few hours after receiving the vaccine.

    Vaccines For Adolescents: A New Generation Of Vaccines

    GAVI Pakistan pneumococcal vaccine Pt4 – 11 Oct 2012 (B-roll)

    Adolescents, like adults, were recommended to get tetanus boosters every 10 years most requiring their first booster dose around age 11. Other than this, however, most adolescents did not require additional vaccines unless they missed one in childhood. By 2005, vaccines specifically recommended for adolescents were only recommended for sub-groups based on where they lived or medical conditions that they had. However, a new group of vaccines became available in the latter part of the decade.

    • New vaccines: Tdap, 2005, meningococcal conjugate , HPV , meningococcal serogroup B vaccine
    • Additional recommendations for existing vaccines: HPV , intranasal influenza vaccine
    • New versions of existing vaccines: HPV
    • Discontinuation of vaccine: intranasal influenza vaccine

    2000

    Pneumococcus

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    Whats The Difference Between Pcv13 And Ppsv23

    PCV13
    helps protect you against 13 different strains of pneumococcal bacteriahelps protect you against 23 different strains of pneumococcal bacteria
    usually given four separate times to children under twogenerally given once to anyone over 64
    generally given only once to adults older than 64 or adults older than 19 if they have an immune conditiongiven to anyone over 19 who regularly smokes nicotine products like cigarettes or cigars
    • Both vaccines help prevent pneumococcal complications like bacteremia and meningitis.
    • Youll need more than one pneumonia shot during your lifetime. A 2016 study found that, if youre over 64, receiving both the PCV13 shot and the PPSV23 shot provide the best protection against all the strains of bacteria that cause pneumonia.
    • Dont get the shots too close together. Youll need to wait about a year in between each shot.
    • Check with your doctor to make sure youre not allergic to any of the ingredients used to make these vaccines before getting either shot.
    • a vaccine made with diphtheria toxoid
    • another version of the shot called PCV7
    • any previous injections of a pneumonia shot
    • are allergic to any ingredients in the shot
    • have had severe allergies to a PPSV23 shot in the past
    • are very sick

    How Is The Pneumococcal Vaccine Made

    Like the Hib vaccine, the pneumococcal vaccine is made from the sugar coating of the bacteria. Antibodies directed against the pneumococcal polysaccharide protect the child without having to take the risk that their first encounter with natural pneumococcus will result in permanent disabilities or death.

    Unfortunately, children less than 2 years old don’t develop very good immune responses to this polysaccharide alone. So the pneumococcal vaccine was made in a manner similar to the Hib vaccine . The pneumococcal polysaccharide is linked to a harmless protein. This version of the vaccine is referred to as the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Once linked, young children are able to make an immune response to the polysaccharide. The big difference between the pneumococcal vaccine and the Hib vaccine is the number of different types of polysaccharides that need to be included in the vaccine. Whereas, there is really only one strain of Hib that causes disease in children, there are about 90 different strains of pneumococcus. Fortunately, most of the serious disease in young children is caused by the 13 strains of pneumococcus contained in the vaccine.

    The pneumococcal vaccine was found to be highly effective in preventing severe pneumococcal infection in a large trial of children injected with the vaccine. About 40,000 children were included in the initial trial of the vaccine. Since its licensure, the pneumococcal vaccine has been given to millions of children safely.

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    Who Should Get The Vaccine

    People over age 65. As you age, your immune system doesnât work as well as it once did. Youâre more likely to have trouble fighting off a pneumonia infection. All adults over age 65 should get the vaccine.

    Those with weakened immune systems. Many diseases can cause your immune system to weaken, so itâs less able to fight off bugs like pneumonia.

    If you have heart disease, diabetes, emphysema, asthma, or COPD , youâre more likely to have a weakened immune system, which makes you more likely to get pneumonia.

    The same goes for people who receive chemotherapy, people who have had organ transplants, and people with HIV or AIDS.

    People who smoke. If youâve smoked for a long time, you could have damage to the small hairs that line the insides of your lungs and help filter out germs. When theyâre damaged, they arenât as good at stopping those bad germs.

    Heavy drinkers. If you drink too much alcohol, you may have a weakened immune system. Your white blood cells donât work as well as they do for people with a healthy immune system.

    People getting over surgery or a severe illness. If you were in the hospital ICU and needed help breathing with a ventilator, youâre at risk of getting pneumonia. The same is true if youâve just had major surgery or if youâre healing from a serious injury. When your immune system is weak because of illness or injury or because itâs helping you get better from surgery, you canât fight off germs as well as you normally can.

    What Is The Prognosis And Recovery Time Of Pneumonia Can You Die

    Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children 5 Years After ...

    Most people with pneumonia improve after three to five days of antibiotic treatment, but a mild cough and fatigue can last longer, up to a month. Patients who required treatment in a hospital may take longer to see improvement.

    Pneumonia can also be fatal. The mortality rate is up to 30% for patients with severe pneumonia who require treatment in an intensive care unit. Overall, around 5%-10% of patients who are treated in a hospital setting die from the disease. Pneumonia is more likely to be fatal in the elderly or those with chronic medical conditions or a weakened immune system.

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